ROSSES MEN by Patrick McGill

Just a dhrink iv water and lave me be
Comrades of mine are near at hand
Others are wanting you more than me
And I’ve got the boys from my own townland.

Mickey Rudagh and Mánus Óg
Next door neighbours they were at home
And Éamonn Rua beyond the bog
And all iv them here near Bapaume.

Platoon Eleven! Ah glory be,
First and foremost in fighting, when
‘Twas out at the front for the world to see
What the world expects iv the Rosses men.

1914 they fell and died
All in a bunch, the boys I’ve known.
And I buried the three of them side by side
And hard it was after to live alone.

1918, it’s thanks be to God
Who calls me to him near Bapaume
It’s here I’d rest – and the world is broad
By the side of the boys I knew at home.

So a dhrink iv water and lave me be;
Comrades iv mine are near at hand;
In death as in life they will neighbour me
Mates iv my own from my own townland.

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James Ward son of Anthony and Nancy Ward nee Boner was born in Upper Keadue on 26th October 1892. He was served in the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards under the alias of James Boner and was killed in action at the Battle of Poelcappelle on 9th October 1917 (*correction). He is buried in Solferino Farm Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium

John McBride

John son of Manus and Mary (nee McGee) Mc Bride was born in Craghey, Dungloe on 27th August 1889. His father was from Derragh, Annagry. He emigrated to Australia and joined the 4th Battalion, Australian Machine Gun Corps (service number 2912). He was killed in action on 8th August 1918 and is buried in Grisy-Gailly Military Cemetery, Somme, France.

Charles Sharkey

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A native of Mullaghduff where he was better known as Charlie Nellie, he was a son of Owenie Eoghan Bhig and Nellie Sharkey. He enlisted into the 1st Battalion of the Irish Guards in Kirkcaldy Fifeshire. His regiment number was 5956. He was killed in action on the 5th day of the battle of Loos  on Thursday September 30th 1915 aged 22 years and is remembered at the Loos Memorial Northern France and at the family plot in Kincasslagh.

Seáinín O’Donnell

Seáinín was a son of Braighnidh  Antoin and Anna Sheain Sheoirse O’Donnell Annagry. He was a brother of James and Kít Neilín’s father. He died in the war but no more information is available.

James McGee

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James was born in Mullaghduff in 1897 to Patrick and Grace McGee nee O’Donnell. He joined the 1st Battalion Irish Guards sometime during the war. He had two uncles and a first cousin in the same regiment. He died of his wounds on Monday September 10th 1917 aged just 20 years. He is buried in Artillery Wood Cemetery, Belguim. The cemetery was begun by the Guards Division in August 1917 after they had captured Artillery Wood itself during the Battle of Pilckem Ridge He was one of the first to be buried in this cemetery and his grave is close to the celebrated Irish poet Francis LedwidgeHis mother Gracie McGee, Mullaghduff received 12s 6d per week on 26th March 1918, increased by 3s 6d on 7th October 1919.

Owen O’Donnell

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A native of Mullaghduff, he was a son of local shopkeeper Maurice and Brigid O’Donnell nee Sharkey. Owenie Mhuruis as he was locally known as was born in 1891.  After completing his education at Mullaghduff National School he got positions with the Ulster Bank in Belfast, Ballina and Manorhamilton. When a vacancy occurred in the Anglo South American Bank he applied. A prerequisite of the job was that the applicant had to become proficient in oral and written Spanish. He taught himself Spanish in order to get the position. The language books he used are still in the possession of his relatives. Owenie got an appointment in Buenos Aires Argentina, but returned to join the Royal Irish Regiment on outbreak of the war. He was offered a commission he turned it down and went to France as a private. He was wounded on October 16th 1916 but after hospitalisation he returned to fight. He was killed in action on July 31st 1917 in Flanders. Owenie was then the sixth soldier from Mullaghduff townland to be killed in the war.

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He is remembered on Panel 6 and 8 at the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, Belguim and at the family plot in Kincasslagh Cemetery.

Andy Gallagher

Andy son of John and Mary Gallagher Owey Island joined 69th Battalion Infantry Regiment known as the Fighting Irish. He fought in France at the Battles of Marne and Meuse-Argonne. He survived the war.

Patrick Mc Ginley

Patrick was a son of Paddy Beag and Anne McGinley nee Curran Mullaghduff. He enlisted in Portobello Edinburgh into the Scots Guards in August 1914. His regiment number was 7468. He was killed in action in France on the 12th of November 1914. He is remembered in Ypres Belguim on panel 11 at the Menin Gate Memorial and also at the family plot in Kincasslagh.

Condy O’Donnell

Condy O’Donnell from Augillies Dungloe  son of John and Bridget O’Donnell joined the 1st Battalion Connaught Rangers in Glasgow at the outbreak of war and was posted to France that autumn. He was killed in action on November 13th 1914 aged 27 years. It is possible that he died from injuries sustained two days earlier at the Battle of Nonneboschen. He is buried in Grave I.A.13 Rue- Du Bacquerot No1 Military Cemetery in the town of Laventie, Northern France.

John Boyle

John Boyle a native of Owey Island was better known as John Den. He joined the 69th Battalion Infantry Regiment in America and saw action in France.

John Brennan

John Brennan better known as John Phroinsias was born in Bunaman Annagry. He was a son of Proinsias and Kate Brennan nee McGee. He joined the 8th Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Lanark and was sent to France. He was killed in action at the Battle of Hulluch on Saturday April 29th 1916 aged 33 years.  He was survived by his wife Rose Ann nee Dunbar and his five year old son who lived in Lanark. His regiment number was 17089. In the week Patrick Pearse declared the Irish Republic on the steps of the GPO, the Irish Brigades of the 16th (Irish) Division suffered horribly in a gas attack launched by the Germans on the 27th of April 1916 at Hulluch. There were 2,128 Irish casualties, 538 were killed, the remainder were to suffer chronic lung and breathing conditions for the rest of their lives. Like the men from the 2nd Dublins back in May 1915, many died years later as a result of this attack. On the 29th of April, the Germans launched another gas attack on the Irish lines, however on this occasion the wind turned right round and blew the gas back over the German lines, the result being equally appalling. John is remembered on the Loos Memorial Panel 128 at Pas de Calais Northern France.

Michael O’Donnell

Michael son of Paddy Johnny and Hannah O’Donnell nee Bonner was born in Rannyhual, Mullaghduff. He joined the 1st Battalion Irish Guards in Kirkcaldy Fifeshire and was given the regiment number 5854. He was wounded at the Battle of Trones Wood and died on Sunday September 17th 1916 aged 25 years. The following is a copy of his last letter he wrote and was found on his person after his death. “My dear Father and Mother, A few lines from your youngest son about to go into battle. I do not know what may happen to me. But if it is God’s holy will that I shall fall, remember that I will be in Heaven. Only a few days ago I lost my poor comrade. He was killed beside me. I hope, dear father, that you will be provided for by my brothers, if God spares them. Dear Father, I am thankful for all you did for me. Goodbye to all my nieces and nephews and cousins, and all my friends in dear old Mullaghduff, goodbye forever dearest Father and Mother, goodbye niece Nora Sharkey. Erin go Bragh.  P.S. If any fond comrade should find this, send to this address, and I hope God will reward them. Michael had four brothers and two nephews and at least two first cousins fighting in the Great War. Brothers Paddy, Jimmy and Manus were in British regiments, brother Maurice was a career soldier in the US Army, nephews Brian Sharkey, James McGee from Mullaghduff  and Daniel Boyle from Dore together with cousins Owenie and Eddie O’Donnell. His nephews James McGee, Daniel Boyle and cousin Owenie O’Donnell paid the ultimate price. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial at the Somme France.

Patrick Duggan

Patrick son of Bartley and Bridget Duggan Calhame was born on June 18th 1896. He enlisted in the 10th Battalion Highland Light Infantry in Hamilton, Scotland on November 2nd 1914. He was sent to France on May 13th 1915 and was killed in action at the Battle of Loos on September the same year. He is remembered on the Loos Memorial in Northern France.

Con Duggan

Con son of Bartley and Bridget Duggan Calhame enlisted in the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles on January 4th 1916 in Lanarkshire where he worked as a tramway driver.  Con lost his life during the last days of the Easter Rising in Dublin aged 23 years. He was shot dead for disobeying an order to fire at the “Rebels”. His brother younger brother Patrick was killed in action in France eleven months previously. His remains were taken back home to Calhame where he was waked. He is buried in the family grave in Kincasslagh, but his name is recorded on a headstone in the Kilmainham Hospital yard.

John O’Donnell

John O’ Donnell a native of Derrynamansher Annagry was a son of Neil and Sarah Anne O’Donnell nee Bell. He joined the Irish Guards in the early 1900s and was retired from duty some months before the outbreak of World War I. When England’s appeal for more men came, he rejoined his old regiment. Soon after he was promoted to the rank of Lance Corporal and was employed as a drill instructor.  John was not content with this role, as he longed to join his regiment at the front. Hence he volunteered for active service and was sent to France on February 28th 1915. On March 16th he was wounded in action and was removed to hospital where he succumbed to his wounds a week later. In a letter to his parents just before he left for France he stated “ Death is only an exit from one state and an entrance to another, and the most noble way to make that transition is in defence of one’s country”.  He concluded by stated that in the event of losing his life that his death should “be a consolation to you to remember that I gave my life in defence of a just and holy cause”.  John was interned in the Bethune Town Cemetery in Northern France. He was 34 years old.

Maurice O’Donnell

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Maurice on June 29th 1873 was one of the eldest sons of Paddy Johnny and Hannah O’Donnell Rannyhual Mullaghduff emigrated to America and enlisted in the US Army in 1891.He was a career soldier and retired in 1937 with the rank of captain having seen action in World War One. He died on December 12th 1949 and is buried in San Francisco National Cemetery, California.

James McGinley 

A native of Mullaghduff, James was a son of Eoghan Ruadh and Grace McGinley nee Sweeney. He enlisted in the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers at Hamilton, Scotland where he lived with his wife Annie nee McCafferty a native of Falcarragh and his young family. His regiment number was 17608. He was killed in action in Gallipoli on Friday June 4th 1915. James is remembered at the Helles Memorial in Turkey.

Owen Boyle

A native of Meenderryowen Annagry he was known locally as Owenie Dhomhnaill Frainc. He joined the Irish Guards in 1915, enlisting in Derry while on the way to work the harvest in Scotland.  He began training at the Army Signal Corps Camp in Dunstable near London. He left for France on the 22nd of December 1915. While serving with the newly formed 2nd Battalion on the opening days of the Battle of the Somme on July 3rd 1916 he was wounded in the head and legs. After been hospitalised he made a good recovery. He took part in the Regiment Games at Tidworth, England in 1917 where he won 1st prize in the long jump clearing 21 feet 4 inches. At Brentwood Essex the same year he completed against the flower of the British Army and took 2nd place in 7 mile cross country race. At that same event he was part of team that beat 600 other competitors. He was demobilised from the Army on March 26th 1919. Owen got a pension on account of his wounds which in 1929 was £1.8s. This was increased to £2.4s by 1948. He died on April 17th 1960 aged 73 years and is interned in the family plot in Annagry Cemetery.

Barry Duggan

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Barry Duggan a son of Charlie and Bridget Duggan nee Sharkey N.T was born in Mullaghduff in February 1893. After receiving primary education at Mullaghduff National School he got first place in the first ever entrance exam for the newly opened St Eunan’s College in 1916. On completion of his studies in Letterkenny he entered a seminary in Rome where he obtained a Doctorate in Philosophy. Now fluent in Gaelic, English, Italian and French he was ordained to the priesthood on February 20th 1916 in Rome by Cardinal Peinpili.  After returning to home in June of that year, he volunteered for service as Chaplin to the Forces at the Western Front. Rev. Duggan was appointed to his new post on November 11th 1916 where on he received the rank of Captain. Send to the France with the 5th Brigade on February 2nd 1917, he served for 4 months before returning to England on sick leave. He returned to the action in France where he served with the 29th Machine Gun Corps on March 23rd 1918. He joined the ranks of the 64th Infantry Brigade attached to the 9th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in May of that year where he served until he was demobilised in February 1919.  He returned home to his native diocese of Raphoe where he carried out his pastoral duties. He died in the Shiel Hospital Ballyshannon while serving as curate in Kilcar on January 18th 1952. He is buried in Kincasslagh cemetery alongside his beloved mother who died only 6 weeks prior.

Rose O’Donnell

Rose O’Donnell daughter of James and Brigid (nee Gallagher) O’Donnell, Cruit Island and Belcruit was born in Cruit Island Upper on 18th February 1874. As a young adult she joined the Sister of Cluny. There were a great number of vocations to his order from the Lower Templecrone parish in the final years of the 19th century owing to a series of missions given by Holy Fathers, cumulating in the infamous “Mission Mhór” were hell and brimstone was preached from the high altar of St Mary’s Churches in Kincasslagh and Annagry.Rose joined the Convent of St. Joseph De Cluny, Dijon, Burgundy, Cote d’Or, France, where she would devote sixty three years of her life. She was awarded the Gold Cross and Ribbon of the Legion of Honour, by the French government, the highest award they can bestow, in recognition of her noble humanitarian work for the French nation, particularly during the first World War. She was for 42 years associated with the world famous Pasteur Hospital in Paris and for 12 years its Superioress. In collaboration with Dr. Pierre Roux, one of its most eminent associates , she assisted with in the foundation of the , established by the renowned Louis Pasteur some years previously.

Pasteur Institute – Classroom, circa 1920; Image: Public Domain

A trained nurse, she dealt most successfully with the various contagious diseases, employing Pasteur’s scientific method of anti-toxin inoculation. She was appointed Mother Superior of the Dijon Convent in 1941, and celebrated her Golden Jubilee there in 1959, on both occassions the Pope sent her his Apostolic Benediction. When Sean T 0 Kelly was President of Ireland he visited her on a number of occasions, as did President de Valera when he was Taoiseach. Rose O’Donnell or  Mother M. Goodrich of Jesus passed on to her eternal reward in the Convent of St. Joseph De Cluny, Dijon on 16th September 1960.

 

Meabha Sharkey

Meabha Sharkey born to Tarlach Óg and Meabha (nee Sharkey) Sharkey, Braade. She was a nun in Paris during WW1. She is pictured below after she returned home to Donegal. She died in St Patrick’s House, Kilmainham, Dublin on 20th February 1938 aged 78 years.

Image: John P Baska Collection

 

 

Lanty Gallagher

Lanty Gallagher was born in Dunmore Carrickfin in 1874 to Johnny the Sailor and Bridget Gallagher nee Forker. He followed his father’s footsteps by joining the Royal Navy in 1898. Lanty was out fishing one day off Gola Island when he stopped a naval vessel and asked the captain if he could join them, after getting approval they towed his fishing craft into Downings. During his naval career he sailed the seven seas on various ships.

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Lanty  joined the new battlecruiser HMS Lion when it was commissioned on June 4th 1912. HMS Lion became the Royal Navy’s flagship in World War I under the command of Vice Admiral David Beatty. Now with the rank of gunner Lanty was to the fore at the first battle in modern naval warfare at Heligoland Bight in August 1914 and Battle of Dogger Bank in January 1915. At the decisive Battle of Jutland he was responsible for firing the first shots from the Lion’s new 13.5 inch guns. During this battle HMS Lion suffered a serious propellant fire that could have destroyed the ship had it not been for the bravery of the turret commander, who posthumously received the Victoria Cross having ordered the magazine to be flooded. Fellow Rosses men John Bonner from Belcruit, Kincasslagh and James Harley from Meendernsloe also took part in the battle aboard other battleships. Lanty retired  in July 1918. He got married after the war and lived back home in Dunmore where he died on July 6th 1957. He is interned in the family plot in Annagry cemetery.

James Harley

James Harley a son of Hugh and Mâire Harley nee Gallagher, was born in Meendernasloe on 5th August 1878. Séimidh Mháire Éamoinn as he was locally known as, joined the Royal Navy  at an early age. A career sailor he saw service through at Scapa Flow, Dogger Bank and Jutland aboard HMS Collingwood during WW1. He retired from the Royal Navy in 1923 and joined the Merchant Navy for another ten year, finally retiring in 1932. A few year after retiring by to the Rosses. He and his family emigrated to Gibbstown, Co. Meath in 1937, part of De Valera’s vision of a new Gaeltacht. He died in Dungloe District Hospital on August 6th 1962 aged 85 years. The following is an extract from a local newspaper article recounting his life at sea: Harley, a middle aged man, who took a stoical and cheery view of his last day in his native Donegal, resealed himself to be a remarkable man in more ways than one. He informed me that in his early twenties he joined the British Navy, in which he served continuously for a period of over twenty years, relinquishing service with the rank of Chief Petty Office. Subsequently he entered the Mercantile Marine, with which he was associated for nearly another ten years. He recounted a number of interesting reminiscences of those sea-faring days, and told with evident pride that he was instructor to the present King when the latter was a cadet on the battleship the “Collingwood.” This was in connection with stokehold duty, and he told of how once he did the King a favour which met with tangible appreciation in connection with the preparation of the complicated plan of an evaporating plant on the ship. The King, he said, proved himself an apt sailor and a thorough gentleman in his relations with the men of all ranks aboard. He also came frequently into personal contact with the Duke of Windsor at, among other times, when he visited the “Collingwood” in 1913, then at Lamlash on the Clyde.

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Image: Royal Collection Trust

He also was one of a bodyguard for the Duke when the latter paid a State visit on Christmas Day, 1922, to the cruiser “Southampton,’ then lying off Calcutta. The King was also with them at the Battle of Jutland, and he added that when the Duke of Windsor came aboard his ship on one occasion he immediately recognised him after a period of seven years since he had last seen him. During the War he served in the North Sea, at Scapa Flow, Dogger Bank, and the Battle ofJutland, returning to civil life in 1923, and abandoning the sea-faring life in 1932. [Derry People, March 27, 1937]

 

Paddy Boyle

Paddy Boyle was born in the Lower Rosses in the closing years of the 19th century. Little is known of his youth but it is believed that he joined the British Army on the onset of the Great War. He served in Mesopotamia possibly with one of the many Indian based regiments, for he had many stories relating to Bombay. Sometime during this period he went absent without leave. The next sighting of Paddy was in Palestine when a soldier of the 10th Division asked him for a light for his cigarette. The soldier was surprised to be answered by an English speaker with a Donegal accent. Paddy rejoined the Army and later served with the Irish Guards in France for the remainder of the war.

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Paddy returned home to the Annagry/Kincasslagh area where lived in various abodes. Although severely shell shocked he supplemented his war pension by mending nets for local fishermen, a trade he possibly learned at the Industrial School in Killybegs prior to his Army days.

Paddy “the net” Boyle c1950s Photo credit: Liam Duffy

 

Paddy died in Braade on St Patrick’s Day  1960 aged 76 years and was interned in Annagry Cemetery.

Hugh Gallagher

Hugh son of Frank and Bridget nee Doherty Gallagher was born in Calhame around 1880. He got married to Gracie Mhór Duffy (Patrick)from Annagry East in 1913. In 1914 he joined the Royal Muster Fusiliers (Regiment No.5344) and saw action in the Balkans. He was discharged on 28 Feb 1919 with a disability pension(12/MG/573).  He returned home to Calhame and their only child Frank was born in 1920. He died in Scotland where he worked seasonally in 1935 and is buried in Annagry Cemetery.

Condy Boyle

Condy Boyle from Belcruit a member of the Irish Guards was severely wounded at Mons.

Condy Gallagher

Condy Gallagher Belcruit  injuried in the Battle of Mons, returned home and died in Arranmore in 1954.

Charles Ward

A native of Roshine Burtonport where he was known as Charlie Phadaí Hudie. Charlie was only 16 when he joined up in Ayr a year or two before the war was declared. He was in Ayrshire with his father working on farms when he joined the 3th/5th Royal Scots Fusiliers.

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He was bought out twice by his father, but he joined up again. When war was declared, his regiment joined the 155th Brigade of the 52nd Division and departed for the Mediterranean in May 1915, landing at Gallipoli and engaging in various actions against the Turkish Army. They evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt in 1916 to defend of the Suez Canal. Later that year he served in Palestine. He deserted while home on leave in 1916, and hid out in the Hills. Charlie later joined the Volunteers where he fought in the Irish War of Independence. He was involved in the Meenbanad Ambush on January 11th 1921 when a trainload of some 150 British soldiers was attacked. Charlie died in Roshine in February 1981 aged 83 and is buried in Belcruit Cemetery.

John O’Donnell

John was born in Meenaleck on October 21st 1889 to Anton and Brigid O’Donnell. John enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders at Leith near Edinburgh on August 22th 1914 and was send to the Western Front. He spent 2 years 168 days in France before a shell landed beside him and blew off one arm just below the elbow. He survived and came back home where he married Mary Byrne at they lived in Annagry.  He died on March 26th 1962 in Annagry and is buried in the local cemetery.

John Bonner

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John Bonner son of James and Mary Bonner of Meenbanad enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Inverkeithing Scotland and received the regiment number 18363. Better known as Jack, he was killed at the Somme on the July 1st 1916 aged 26yrs. Jack is buried in the Sucrerie Military Cemetery in Colincamps France.

Patrick McGarry

Patrick listed as been born in Kincasslagh joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Inverkeithing Scotland. He possibly joined on the same day as Jack Bonner from Meenbanad as they were in the same regiment and his number was 18380. He could have been working in the same as Jack and may have come from the Keadue/Meenbanad area. Patrick was killed in action in France on March 21st 1918 and is buried in Grave II.E.13 Unicorn Cemetery Vendhuile France. He could have been the Patrick McGarvey who was serving alongside Jack Bonner according to a letter home to Jack’s sister.

Neice Bonner

Neice was brother of Jack Bonner and a son of James and Mary Bonner of Meenbanad. He was working in a coal mine when joined the Irish Guards in Perth on 2nd  November 1914. He left Caterham Barracks on New Year’s Eve 1914 and was reported to have deserted in the Police Gazette in January 1915. His service number was 5878.According to local knowledge he was reputed to have taken weapons home to the local Volunteers, which was later used against the Crown Forces. He later lived in Scotland where he died.

Paddy Bonner

Paddy Bonner survived at gas attack in France during WW1. After hospitalisation he returned home to Meenbanad. He died in the 1950s and is buried in Kincasslagh Cemetery. His brother Jack was killed at the Somme and his other brother Neice survived the war.

Thomas Boyd

Tommy as he was better known as was born on October 25th 1891 in Carrickfin to Christy John Mhór and Lizzie Boyd nee Foster. He emigrated to America in his youth. When the United States joined the war, Tommy enlisted in the army. He was sent to France in 1918, but had the good fortune of landing there on the last days of the war. He served in France as a peacekeeper before returning to the States. Several years later he returned home to look after his ageing parents. He married Jennie Boyd from Carnboy and they reared their family on the family farm. He died on November 29th 1977 and is buried in Bunbeg Cemetery.

Edward O’Donnell

Edward O’Donnell son of Maurice and Brigid O’Donnell nee Sharkey Mullaghduff joined the Kings Own Scottish Borderers. He deserted while home on leave.

Edward Boyle

Edward a son of Mickey Phadaí Mhicheál and Anna Sheáinín Boyle was born in Carrickfin in 1889. Neddy as he was better known as emigrated to his brother Paddy in St Louis Missouri USA in April 1910.

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He served in the US Navy during WW1. He later married Mary Delahunt from Co.Tipperary and they raised their family in the States.

James Boyd

James Wilson Boyd born in 1882 was the eldest son of Jamesy Nellie and Annie Boyd nee Wilson of Carnboy, Carrickfin.

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Jimmy Jamesy Nellie as he was better known as emigrated to New Zealand with his cousins and his neighbour Paddy Gallagher in 1904. When he left home he thought he’d never see his siblings again, but one man’s misfortune turned into Jimmy’s opportunity. With the war raging across the world, the young dairy farmer enlisted in No.52061 Unit, 1st Battalion, Wellington Regiment on July 1st 1917 and was transferred to the 1st Tunnelling Company on 13th July. He sailed aboard the SS. Waitemata arriving at Plymouth, England on September 24th of the same year. He served from 9th April 1917 until 5th August 1919 in Boulogne and Éstaples in northern France. He was admitted to a field hospital on 3rd January 1918 and discharged on 5th August 1919. After his service, he was granted leave to visit Carnboy to see his folks and on 27th May 1919,  he landed in London aboard S.S. Tahiti on the first leg of that journey. He spend two nights at home, before leaving again for the last time. He died on October 27th 1964 and is buried in the Soldiers Cemetery, Kiakoura, South Island, New Zealand.

James Duffy

James Duffy born in Annagry East in 1895 was a son of Donnchadh Phadaí and Annie Duffy nee Harley. He joined the Deal Battalion Royal Marine Light Infantry from home. His mother Annie tried her best to get him to leave the forces but he insisted on staying.

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He received the rank of private and the number 17501. He sailed for Eastern Front landing in Gallipoli where he was wounded. He was hospitalised in Alexandria Egypt, but later returned to Cape Helles where he was killed in action on December 11th 1915 on the last days of the British offensive in that region. He is remembered on the SP. Memorial at the Redoubt Cemetery in Helles, Turkey.

 Edward Sweeney

Edward Sweeney born in Meenacrieve Annagry in 1890 was the son of Paddy Neddy and Cecily Sweeney. On the outbreak of war he joined the Merchant Navy. Ned as he was better known was posted on the SS. Marina a Glasgow registered former liner of the Donaldson line. He was lost at sea when his ship while making a voyage from Glasgow to Balitmore was sunk by U-55 on October 28th 1916. SS. Marina sank in the same area the Lusitania went down in 1915. Ned is remembered on the Tower Hill Memorial in London.

Denis Duffy

Denis Duffy son of Brian and Annie nee O’Donnell Duffy Annagry East was born on 22nd January 1893 in the mother someplace in Crickamore. He joined the 6th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles and received the regiment number 962 in Glasgow on October 21st 1914. Prior to this he was employed by David Bailey at Inch Farm, Carluke, Lanarkshire. His father Bernard was then working in Scotland and gave his address as Bonfreight Place, Douglas Water, Lanark. Denis was one of the many men that were pressurised into the war while worked at the harvest. He was posted to the Balkans in July 1915 where he spent 198 days. He was send home on leave due medical grounds in January 1916. He was finally discharged from duty on January 25th 1917.

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He was suffering from anaemia and received a weekly disability pension of 6 schillings per week. Denis died at home in 1921 and is buried in Annagry Cemetery.  His sister was married toJohn Byrne, Loughanure, mother of author Bernard J. Byrne.

Credit; Irish Graveyards

Anthony C. O’Donnell

Private Anthony C. O’Donnell was a son of Daniel O’Donnell Cranaguiggy. He was married to Sally McGarvey of Loughanure. They had no family. He was a member of the 2nd Reserve Battalion Irish Guards in England. He died in England on December 3rd 1914 and is buried in Caterham and Warlingham Cemetery, Surrey.

Hugh Bonner

Hugh joined 31st Coy Machine Corps which was part of the 10th (Irish) Division. During his time in the war he was promoted to the rank of Corporal. He entered the name of Charles Bonner Loughanure cousin and his next of kin on his enlistment papers. Hugh was born in Loughanure and his sister was Sarah married to Hugh Duffy Meenacrieve Annagry. The 31st Machine Gun Company was formed from the Machine Gun Sections of 31st Brigade on the 11th May 1916 at Basingstoke. They departed from Liverpool on the 9th of July for Lemnos. The 31st Brigade landed  at Sulva Bay on the 6th and 7th of August 1915 and made an attack on Chocolate Hill on the 7th and 8th. They were withdrawn from Gallipoli on the 31st of September 1915 to Mudros, moving to Salonika, landing between the 5th and 10th of October. It is possible that Hugh died as a result of his wounds in a hospital in Alexandria Egypt on October 16th 1917. He is buried in Grave C.35 in the Alexandria Hadra War Memorial Cemetery in Egypt.

 Charles Sweeney

Charles Sweeney son of John and Mary Sweeney Thor Crolly joined the 2nd Battalion Cameronians, Scottish Rifles (8215). He was killed in action on March 10th 1915 the first day of the Battle of Neuve Chapelle in Flanders aged 33 years. He is remembered on Panel 15/16 Le Touret Memorial Northern France.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher, Ranafast, a private in the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (27403), died with general paralysis in the Asylum in Letterkenny on 13th March 1919. He was transferred to Letterkenny from the Belfast War Hospital. He was 49 years of age. He was posthumously awarded the Victory and British war medals in 1923. His brother  38 year old brother Patrick Gallagher, Ranafast received his pension in 1921.

Michael Boyle

Michael Boyle, Ranafast, a private in the Royal Scots (38101) when missing in action on 31st July 1917, he was presumed dead in 1918. His father James received a pension in 1923.

John Duffy 

John Duffy son of Hugh Duffy, Ranafast joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers at Omagh on 17th August 1916. He stated in his service record that he was then eighteen years of age, but he was discharged 22 days later when officers found his true age. 

Charles Boyle

Charles Boyle son of Rose Boyle, Meenaleck joined the 8th Battalion Welsh Borderers[sic] possibly the South Wales Borderers. He must have been killed or missing presumed dead because his mother received a war pension on 16th October 1918.

Denis Harley

Denis Harley, 24 year old general labourer, with an address at 197 Main St, Gorbals, Glasgow joined the 3rd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers(18955) in that city on 16th December 1915. He was discharged on medical ground in Cork on 10th May 1915. He was a son of Denis Harley, Derrynamansher.

James Doherty

James Doherty son of Falcarragh based school teacher Anthony J. and Mary Doherty of Cruit Island. James born on November 21st 1898 was one of the youngest to volunteer for military service at the outbreak of war. Rising to the rank of Lance Corporal in the 1th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, he died of his wounds sustained in a prisoner of war camp on March 24th 1918. He is buried in Grave I. G. 20 Saint-Souplet Cemetery Northern France.

Hugh O’Donnell

Hugh O’Donnell son of Hughie and Mary O’Donnell nee McLoone Rampart Burtonport was a school teacher before he joined the Army Ordnance Corp. He was discharged due to a heart condition in 1918.

James Ward and James Duffy

James Ward from Cloughlass Burtonport served in the Army. He deserted while at home on leave in 1917. He was arrested along with fellow deserter James Duffy from Meenbannad at a dance in Kincasslagh and was taken to Burtonport RIC Barracks where they were held. The local company of the Irish Volunteers received intelligence that both prisoners were to be taken by train to Derry to be court marshalled. The Volunteers decided to rescue the men from the train and on January 3rd 1918 this was carried out successfully without a single shot being fired. This incident has been described as the first official attack on crown forces in the War of Independence and can be further examined here in this analysis by John B. Sharkey, Meenbanad James emigrated to the USA, where he was again called upon for national service. He was killed in a traffic accident in US on July 4th 1931.  James Duffy joined the Irish Army and lived in Athlone.

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James Ward (Susan) Cloughglass pictured in a US uniform. Photo: Susie Boyle

James Duffy

James Duffy, a 19 year old miner, with an address at 32 Balance Terrace, Bowhill, Candenden, joined the 9th Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders(5/8287) at Kirkcaldy on 29th April 1915. He was a son of Mary Duffy, Bunawillion, Kincasslagh. He was discharged on 7th May 1915.

Manus Boyle

Manus Boyle son of Donal and Ellen Boyle of Crolly joined the 6th Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers in Hamilton Scotland. He was killed in action during the landings of Sulva Bay in the Dardanelles on August 15th 1915. He is remembered on Panel 185 to 190 Helles Memorial Turkey.

Charles O’Donnell

Charles O’Donnell son of Patrick and Mary O’Donnell Meenbanad enlisted in No. 3 Company 2nd Battalion Irish Guards in Glasgow. He died on September 15th 1916 on the first day of the Battle of Flers–Courcelette aged 23. He is buried in Grave X.H.8 Guards Cemetery Les Boeufs Somme France.

John Doogan

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John Doogan with an address ℅ M.A. Semple, Rosebank Farm, Mid-Calder joined the Royal Field Artillery in Bathgate on 12th May 1914. Aged 19 years, he was a son of Rose Duggan Bunawack Crolly. He was discharged after three months. Sometime later John joined the 16th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. He died of his wounds he received while fighting at Ancre on March 6th 1917 aged 22. He is buried in Grave I.D.7 Cerisy-Gailly Military Cemetery Somme France.

Paddy McGinley

Paddy McGinley son of Frank Beag and Mary McGinley nee Gallagher Mullaghduff joined the Royal West Kent Regiment in Chatham England on October 26th 1914. He was discharged in January 1915.

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Patrick McGinley pictured with his sister Nellie

Hugh McGinley

Hugh was a son of Frank Beag and Mary McGinley nee Gallagher Mullaghduff and a  brother of Patrick above. He was a policeman in England but joined the Royal Leicester Regiment on the outbreak of war.

Charles Kennedy

Charles Kennedy son of Neil and Mary Kennedy nee Doogan Croveigh emigrated to Australia in his youth. He joined the 2nd Australian Pioneers on the 13th May 1916.

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He died from injuries received at the Battle of Passchendaele on October 3rd 1917 aged 35 years just two months after his contemporary Manus Máire from Meenaweal who died during the same offensive. He is remembered on Panel 172 Lijssentheok Military Cemetery Poperinge Belguim.

Manus O’Donnell

Manus O’Donnell son of James and Máire O’Donnell nee McCole Meenaweal Crolly joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Glasgow. He died from injuries received at the Battle of Passchendaele on August 6th 1917 aged 30 years.

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Manus is buried in Grave III.D.16 Iper Town Cemetery Extension in Belgium.

Patrick Campbell

Lance Corporal Patrick Campbell was a son of Dan and Mary Campbell Lackenagh Burtonport. On the outbreak of war he joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers where he was promoted to Lance Corporal. Patrick was killed in action during the Battle of Festubert on May 16th 1915 aged 24 years. He is remembered at Panel 16/17 Le Touret Memorial Northern France.His mother Mary Campbell with an address in Milltown received a pension of 5s per week.

John Boner

John Boner, a 27 year old miner, joined the Tunnelling Company, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in Clipstone, Nottinghamshire on 16th August 1916. His next of kin was his brother James Boner, ℅ Mr. C. Rodgers, Burtonport. He was transferred to the 3rd Provision Company, Royal Engineers in September 1917. He fought in France during 1916/17 and was discharged from further service on 4th June 1917, due to a recurring injury he received in the coal mines in Fifeshire in 1908.

John O’Donnell

John O’Donnell born in Burtonport, a 35 year old miner, joined the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots (4216) at Glencourse on 21st September 1914. His next of kin was his wife Mrs Catherine O’Donnell nee Morgan of Clerk Place, South Queensferry. A native of South Queensferry, Catherine Morgan married John in May 1899. When John enlisted he stated that they had seven children; Mary, 14 years; Patrick, 13 years; Kate 10 years; Annie, 8 years; James, 7 years and three others between 5 years and 4 months. John was sent to France on 14th April 1915. A week after he arrived at the front he received a gun-shot wound to his right leg on 18th April 1915 and was hospitalised until 18th May 1915. He was wounded in the head by a shell on 2nd December 1915 and was wounded a third time on 25th November 1917. He spent a week in General Hospital in February 1916 suffering from shock and gastric obstruction when he swallowed a fish bone.  He continued his service in France throughout the war, returning home to South Queensferry on 4th March 1919.

John O’Donnell

John J.O’Donnell, son of John J.O’Donnell Snr., Meenmore, a private in “E” Company, 28th Engineers, US Army sailed from Brest aboard USS Patricia in route to Hoboken, New Jersey on 24th June 1919, after completed his tour of duty.

Patrick O’Donnell 

Patrick J. O’Donnell, son of John Gallagher, Milltown, a corporal in ‘D” Company, 2nd Engineers, US Army sailed from Brest aboard USS Great Northern in route to Hoboken, New Jersey on 1st August 1919, after completed his tour of duty.

Anna Boyle

Anna A. Boyle, a daughter of Mary Boyle, Burtonport served as a Reserve Nurse with the American Red Cross Base Hospital No. 52 at Rimaucourt, north-eastern France. She set sail for Europe aboard the steamer “Saxon” from New York on 24th September 1918.

Daniel Mc Cole

Daniel Mc Cole son of Patrick and Mary McCole Lettercaugh joined the 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards(5988). He who went missing in action during the Battle of the Lys on April 13th 1918 aged 44 years. He is remembered on Panel Ploegsteert Memorial Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. His father Patrick McCole with an address in Cragheyboyle claimed his pension after his death was confirmed on 18th March 1922.

John Ward

John Ward son of Sean and Mary Ward nee Gallagher of Glenahilt Burtonport left Moville abroad the s.s.Columbia bound for America on September 2nd 1909. He joined A Company 320th Infantry Force US Army as a mechanic. He was killed in action on October 9th 1918 aged 32 years. He was buried in Nantellois Cemetery France but his remains where taken home and reinterred in the family plot in Kincasslagh Cemetery. The US Military erected a headstone to his memory.

Patrick O’Donnell

Patrick O’Donnell son of Frank and Kate O’Donnell Glasbeggan joined the Scottish Rifles in Glasgow in September 1914 but was later transferred to the 1th Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers (18338). He came home on leave for three weeks in March 1916. He was hospitalised for 36 days in Flanders as a result of gas poisoning, but succumbed on April 12th 1918 aged 30 years. He is remembered on Panel 1 Ploegsteert Memorial Comines-Warneton Hainaut Belgium.

Patrick Bonner

Patrick Bonner son of Godfrey and Annie Bonner nee Forker Arlands Burtonport joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. He died of his wounds on Saturday April 30th 1918 aged 20 years. He is buried in Grave VIII.C.25 Cologne Southern Cemetery Germany

Denis Duffy

Denis son of Andy and Peggy Duffy nee Boyle was born in Annagry West in 1894 He joined the war effort while working in Scotland. It is though he was in the ranks of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. After seeing action in Salonika he deserted while on leave in England. Undetected he spent the rest of his life in Preston, Lancashire. He died in 1974 aged 82 and is buried in Preston.

Joseph McGonagle

Fr. Joseph McGonagle a native of Owey Island was Chaplin to the 16th Irish Division during the war. He returned to the Diosse of Raphoe where he ministered in such places as Tory Island and Meenacross. He never fully recovered from the horrors of administering at the Western Front.

Charles McGonagle

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Charles McGonagle son of Stephen and Annie McGonagle Owey Island joined the 1st Battalion Irish Guards(4738). He was killed at Cruinchy France in a place called Brickfields on February 14th 1915 aged 20 years. Charles is buried in Grave II.D.9 in the Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner Cuinchy.His aunt Mrs Sophia Doherty, Owen Island who was born 1852,  claimed his pension

David Boyd 

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David son of Jamesy Nellie Boyd and Annie Boyd nee Wilson of Carnboy, Carrickfin emigrated to his brother Jimmy in 1910. He enlisted in Unit 1st Battalion Wellington Regiment and sailed aboard the SS. Waitemata arriving at Plymouth, England on September 24th 1917. During his service in France he was granted leave with his brother Jimmy to return home to Carnboy to see his folks. He spend two nights at home in November 1918, before leaving again for the last time. He died relatively young on December 17th 1943 aged 57 years and is buried in Kiakoura, South Island, New Zealand.

James McGonagle

James McGonagle son of Stephen and Annie McGonagle Owey Island joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers on the outbreak of war and was posted to France. He was wounded in action and was invalided home from the front.  He was drowned off the local steam drifter “Gweedore” while returning from the doctor in Burtonport after getting his wounds dressed.

 James Boyle

Second Lieutenant James Boyle joined the 59th Infantry Regiment, 4th Division, US Army in New Jersey and rose to the rank of Second Lieutenant.  A son of Patrick and Fanny Boyle, he was a native if Miltown, Burtonport. He was killed in action in France on 1st October 1918. He is buried in Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, Plot A Row 35 Grave 32, Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, France.

Credit: http://www.abmc.gov/print/certificate/326913

Mr. O’Donnell

An O’Donnell from Owey Island served in the war.

John McGinley

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John McGinley son of Owen and Grace McGinley nee Sweeney of Mullaghduff was married in Scotland when he joined the Royal Navy. While on leave in Scotland, he deserted the army taking his wife back to Mullaghduff where they lived. Not long after they landed in Mullaghduff their son Neil was born. John later enlisted with the Inniskillings and served in France during the Great War, his service number was 31247. His son Neil joined the British army in the Second World War and was held prisoner by the Japanese in the death camps of Thailand. After the war John lived the rest of his days in Scotland with his wife and family.

Neil Sharkey

Neil Sharkey born in Helensburgh, Scotland was a grandson of Dominic Sharkey from Calhame and Mary Boyle from Carrickfinn. He joined the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and became a servant. and died of his wounds on May 17th 1917. He is buried in Grave IV. L. 43 in Duisans British Cemetery in Etrun, Northern France.

 

Michael Boyle

Michael Boyle stated in his service record that he was a son of Mary Boyle Annagry Mountain and that he was born in 1887. He may have been a son of James and Mary Boyle nee Doogan of the Cruckakeehan area. He served with the Royal Irish Rifles (1017) on 23rd October 1914 at Lanark. After a training in Ireland, he served in the Mediterranean from 11th Jul 1915 until 28th June 1916, when he returned to Ireland on 29th June 1916. He was charged with desertion on a number of occasions and he was court-marshalled on 29th January 1918 and was sentenced to fifteen months in Derry Dention Barracks and stoppage of pay (£4. 0s.1.25d) for 6 months. The cause of his desertion may have been caused by shell shock. He rejoined his regiment on 1st October 1918, and his sentence was remitted (check word) on 30th June 1919. He was reposted on 11th June 1919 and was tranferred to Class ‘Z” Army Reserve on demobilization on 8th July 1919; completing a total four years and 240 days service. Suffering from malaria, he was deemed 30% disabled and recieved a pension of 8s 3d per week. I believe he was the same Michael Boyle that died from exposure in Dungloe on 12th December 1919 aged 29 years.

Daniel Boyle

Daniel Boyle enlisted in the Royal Irish Rifles and received the regiment number 1018. He was almost certainly a brother of Michael Boyle from Cruckaceehan as the regiment number was only one digit apart and they were part of the same regiment. He was discharged for the war in 1917.

Doalty Sharkey

Doalty Sharkey son of Brian and Anne Sharkey nee Forker Mullaghduff joined the Royal Irish Fusiliers in Edinburgh on November 17th 1914. He was posted to the Expeditionary Force in January 1915. Doalty embarked from Marseilles to Salonika in August 1916. Later that month his father Brian received a letter from the war office stating that Doalty was in the General Hospital in Salonika.. After recovering he left Salonika and arrived in Alexandria in September 1917 where he was again hospitalised in 1918. He was discharged in January 1919 and returned home to Mullaghduff. Doalty returned to Edinburgh after the war and settled there.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher son of Manus and Catherine Gallagher nee Ward Glenahilt Burtonport saw action in Flanders where he was shell shocked at Lille France.

Hugh Sweeney

Hugh Sweeney of Acres Burtonport who joined in 1914 and was part of the Irish Division in France during the war. He was awarded an Honorary Parchment Certificate in recognition of gallantry he displayed at the Battle of Messines Ridge in Flanders on June 7th and 8th 1917.

Michael McGeehan

Michael McGeehan son of Mrs P McGeehan, Burtonport, then 21 years old clerk with L.N.W.R joined  the Royal North Lewis Regt (10928-Armlet Number: 56968)) in Preston on 10th August 1914. Several weeks later on 1/9/1914 he was was appointed Lance Corporal and again promoted to the rank of Corporal on 14/10/1914 (Armlet Number: 56968). He discharged for further service on 1st April 1915 because he was no longer physically fit.

William Boyle

William Boyle, a 35 year old single man with an address at 75 Grass Market, Edinburgh joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (18046) in the same city on 12th December 1914 and the following day posted to Omagh. He stated that his next of kin was his uncle John O’Donnell at Upper Milltown, Dungloe. in June of the following year he was given 14 days field punishment for a ‘No. 2’ offence and on 10th July 1915 posted with the Expeditionary Force to the Mediterranean. On 2nd August 1915 he was given another week of field punishment No. 2 for  ‘insolence to an Officer.’ No further information.

Jimmy O’Donnell

Jimmy was born in September 1890 enlisted at Greenock in the Irish Guards on October 21st 1915 and received the regiment number 9973. He was sent to France on June 6th 1916 and was wounded in action on September 25th 1916. After hospitalisation he returned to the front on June 4th 1917. Jimmy Johnny as he was locally known had a number off near misses including been saved by the quick thinking of a fellow guardsman from Mullaghduff. He was wounded for the second time on October 9th 1917 and was again hospitalised and send back to barracks in London on November 11th. On February 11th 1918 he was sent to Dublin but he had to wait until March 5th 1920 before he was finally discharged from the Army. He returned home to Cul a’ Cnoic Annagry where he married. His wife died at a young age and he remarried.  Jimmy died on the March 12th 1978 and is buried in Annagry Cemetery.

Dominic Gallagher

Dominic Gallagher son of Paddy and Sheila Gallagher nee Sweeney Rannyhual Mullaghderg served in France with the Irish Guards. He later joined the Irish Army.

Manus O’Donnell

Manus O’Donnell Glasbeggan Burtonport was wounded in Dardanelles in 1915 and was hospitalised in Wales.

Jimmy Duggan

Jimmy Duggan son of Bartley and Bridget Duggan Calhame joined the 10th Battalion Highland Light Infantry in Scotland. He was discharged 1915 on medical grounds. He later married Sally Duffy from Calhame.

Hugh Boyle

Hugh Boyle a son of Owen and Ellen Boyle was born in Ranamona Annagry about 1875. He served in the Dardanelles and Salonika during the war. He was better known as Hughie Eoghain Phádraig Chondaí. He died in Ranamona in September 1955 and is buried in Annagry Cemetery.

Andrew Sharkey

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Andrew Sharkey son of Neddy and Kate Sharkey nee Rodgers of Braade joined a calvary regiment in Scotland where he lived. He saw action in France and after the war returned to Shotts Lanarkshire where he married and raised his family. His parents and young sister Cassie died inside one week in 1919 from the Spanish Flu which spread across Europe after the war.

Diminic Gallagher

Diminic Gallagher son of Charlie and Betty Gallagher nee O’Donnell Annagry joined Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Lanark Scotland in 1914 but was discharged a number of weeks later. He rejoined in Omagh in 1916 but later deserted.

Fergal Boyle

Fergal Boyle son of Donal and Mary Boyle Bunaman was a policeman before he joined the ranks of No. 4 Company 1st Battalion Irish Guards. Promoted to the rank of sergeant he saw service in France and Germany where he was peacekeeping in 1919.

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During his time in the Guards he took part in many sporting events. He won first prize in a five mile cross country race held on the famous Epsom racecourse and at Brentwook, Essex he won a seven mile cross country race. He later emigrated to Canada in 1928.

James Rodgers

James Rodgers Lettercaugh joined the Cycling Corps section of the Inniskilling Fusiliers as a Dispatch Rider with the regiment number 1518. He saw action in the Dardanelles, Palestine, Belgium and France. He returned home after the war, married and raised his family.

Charlie Gallagher

Charlie Gallagher son of Paddy and Fanny Gallagher Annagry joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Lanark Scotland in 1914. He was later discharged.

John Sharkey

John Sharkey son of Anton and Brigid Boyle Mullaghduff served in France with the North Irish Horse which was the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He returned at lived at home.

Barney O’Donnell

Barney O’Donnell son of Charlie and Brigid O’Donnell nee Sharkey Annagry joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Lanark Scotland in 1914. He was later discharged.

James Duffy

James Duffy born in Thor Crolly in 1889 joined the 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers at the outbreak of the war. On 27 December 1917 at Kereina Peak, Palestine, whilst the company was holding a very exposed position, James, a stretcher-bearer, and another stretcher-bearer went out to bring in a seriously wounded comrade. When the other stretcher-bearer was wounded, James returned to get another man, who was killed almost immediately. The private then went forward alone and, under very heavy fire, succeeded in getting both wounded men under cover and attended to their injuries. His gallantry undoubtedly saved both men’s lives. He was awarded the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces which is now on display at the Inniskilling Museum in Enniskillen Castle. He was carrying Gartan clay on his person during the war. He returned home and married in Letterkenny where he died in April 7th 1969 aged 79. He is buried in Conwal cemetery Letterkenny.

John Bonar

John Boner, a 27 year old miner, joined the Tunnelling Company, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers(175864) in Clipstone, Nottinghamshire on 16th August 1916. His next of kin was his brother James Boner, ℅ Mr. C. Rodgers, Burtonport. He was transferred to the 3rd Provision Company, Royal Engineers in September 1917. John received 2s2d per day wages. He fought in France during 1916/17 and was discharged from further service on 4th June 1917, due to a recurring injury he received in the coal mines in Fifeshire in 1908.

Anthony O’Donnell 

Anthony O’Donnell Burtonport wounded in France November 1915. He was reported in the local newspaper as being presumed dead, but he survived the war.

Joe Coyle

Joe Coyle son of Charles and Bridget Coyle nee Boyle Crolly enlisted in the Machine Gun Corps Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers on August 14th 1916. In September 1917 his father received official news that Joe had been wounded for a second time. After been injured in a gas attack he was taken back to a Belfast hospital. He resided in Crolly until his death on March 9th 1977 . He is buried in Magheragallon Cemetery.

John Bonner

John Bonner Belcruit a member of the Royal Navy saw action at the Battle of Jutland in 1916.

Eddie O’Donnell

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Edward O’Donnell a son of Neil and Sarah Anne O’Donnell nee Bell Derrynamansher joined the Royal Navy at the outbreak of war. Local known as Eddie Neil Sheamuisín, he was badly injured in action. He emigrated to New Zealand where he died.

Manus Conaghan

Manus Conaghan from Crickamore joined the Royal Highlanders Black Watch (6198) on October 14th 1914 while he was employed as a coal miner in Lochgelly, Fifeshire, Scotland. He was a 33 year old widower (deceased wife was Mary) and was discharged after 14 days medically unfit. His four children Patrick, Owen , Brigid and Mary who were all born in Acres were in the care of Mrs Daniel Coll in Sheskinarone.

James O’Donnell

James O’Donnell son of Neil and Sarah Anne O’Donnell nee Bell Derrynamansher joined the British Army and served in WW1. He married Mary O’Donnell (Condy), Ranafast. He survived the war.

Joseph O’Donnell

Joseph O’Donnell from Glasbeggan Burtonport served in France.

John Boyle

John Boyle born in Ranafast in 1878 was better known as Johnny Gráinne. He enlisted in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Lanark Scotland while he was employed as a farm labourer in Carstairs. He was married to Cicily McGarvey from Ranafast.

John O’Donnell

John O’Donnell from Glasbeggan Burtonport was seriously wounded in France before December 1915 and hospitalised in Edinburgh.

James Donald

James Donald  who was born in Templecrone and lived in Loughanure joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He was killed in action on November 8th 1915 at Sulva Bay Gallipoli. He is buried in Grave II.G.7 Azmak Cemetery Turkey.

Francis Gallagher

Francis Gallagher son of Frank and Margaret O’Donnell Roshine Burtonport joined the 6th Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers (5151). He was killed in action in Macedonia on October 4th 1916 aged 26 years. He is remembered on the Doiran Memorial in Northern Greece.

John Gillespie

John Gillespie son of Paddy and Bridget Gillespie nee Sweeney of Mullaghduff joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Rothesay Scotland in September 1914. He was discharged after 69 days service

Patrick O’Donnell

Patrick O’Donnell son of Paddy and Hannah O’Donnell nee Bonner Rannyhual joined the Irish Guards while in Scotland in 1914 saw action in France. When he returned from the war he married in Gweedore.

Manus O’Donnell

Manus O’Donnell son of Paddy and Hannah O’Donnell nee Bonner Rannyhual who joined the Royal Irish Rifles in  Scotland was posted to France. Hs name appeared in the “wounded’ section of the Londonderry Sentinelon 23rd October1917. His service number was 1558.

Jimmy O’Donnell

Jimmy O’Donnell son of Paddy and Hannah O’Donnell nee Bonner Rannyhual joined the Royal Engineers in 1914 in Scotland and was posted to France.

Denis O’Donnell

Denis son of Patrick (Johnny) O’Donnell Mullaghduff joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Maryhill, Glasgow on July 24th 1918. According to Army records, he was born in 1886 and was resident at 57 Portugal St, Glasgow. He was posted to France in November 26th 1918 and was later transferred to the 5th Battalion Royal Irish Regiment in March 1919. He was actually born in Mullaghduff on November 8th 1888.

Brian Sharkey

Brian Sharkey son of Neil and Mary Sharkey nee O’Donnell Mullaghduff joined the Irish Guards in 1914 in Scotland and served in France

Michael O’Donnell

Michael O’Donnell a son of Jack and Rose O’Donnell nee McFadden Loughanoran joined the 8th Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Hamilton Scotland in November 1914 but was later discharged.

Francie Sharkey

Francie Sharkey son of Eoin Beag and Anne Sharkey nee O’Donnell from Braade served in the Western Front.

Hugh O’Donnell

Hugh O’Donnell son of Neil and Sarah Anne O’Donnell nee Bell Derrynamansher joined the Royal Irish Rifles in 1914 but later served in the Northamptonshire Regiment and the Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Andrew Curran

 Andrew Curran son of Owen and Máire Curran nee Gallagher of Dunmore Carrickfin was born in 1885. He joined the Seaforth Highlanders in Scotland and served in France. After the war he  married Agnes Pullar and lived in East Calder. He worked in Shale-oil works the Pumpherston. He died in East Calder on February 28th 1976.

John Ward

 John Ward Meenagowna Burtonport served as a peacekeeper in France after the war.

Dan O’Donnell

Dan O’Donnell Leitircaugh joined the Inniskilling Fusiliers. He received severe head injuries in the war and returned home.

Anthony Walsh

Anthony Walsh Ardveen was a member of the Army Service Corps. This regiment organised supplies including ammunition for the forces.

John Ward

John Ward (Paddy Sheila) from Upper Keadue joined the war effort but deserted while home on leave.

James Boyle

James Boyle son of Doalty and Grace Boyle Mullaghderg emigrated to Bayonne New Jersey USA on November 16th 1915. He served in the US Army in France.

Anthony O’Donnell

Anthony O’Donnell son of Anthony and Mary O’Donnell nee O’Donnell of Belcruit. He died at home in Belcruit in 1924 of injuries sustained in the war. His medals are on permanent display at the Donegal County Museum in Letterkenny.

Anthony O’Donnell

Anthony O’Donnell Belcruit, claimed the pension for his son Anthony O’Donnell, Gunner, Royal Field Artillery (655/146) who died from Phitisis after discharge on 24th August 1920.

John Coll

John Coll Sheskinarone was severely wounded in France.

Hugh Ward

Hugh Ward from Roshine Burtonport served at the Western Front.

Simon Gallagher

Simon Gallagher son of Diminic Óg and Mary Gallagher Rannyhual Mullaghderg served in France.

Hugh Ward

He was the son of Hugh and Norah Ward Burtonport. He joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in Omagh on June 10th 1915 aged 18 exactly. He was discharged under pay on July 20ththe same year. The reason is unknown. He later received an army pension.

John Boyle

John Boyle of Crolly, Templecrone joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He could have been from Meenaleck.

Paddy Duffy

Paddy Duffy from Annagry joined the forces in Scotland in 1914.

Mr. McDevitt from  Owey Island served in the Irish Guards.

John Byrne son of Ruairí and Fanny Byrne Loughanure serced in the war.

Hugh Gallagher Lackenagh Burtonport

Denis “Soldier” Doogan Ranamona Annagry, died in 27th September 1970 aged 88

Neil Sharkey Mullaghduff

Paddy Devenney (Biddy Tharlaigh/Harley) Ranafast

Anthony O’Donnell from born in The Rosses in 1883 served in Salonika with the Camorian Highlanders, service No.16639

Mr Barr from Cruit Island was wounded in action

Manus O’Donnell

Manus O’Donnell a 23 year old from Burtonport enlisted in Melbourne, Australia in February 1915. He was employed as a farm labourer when he joined the 22nd Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force. His regimental number was 662. He left Australia for one of the theatres of war  in June 1915.

J Doogan

J Doogan born in Kincasslagh (Parish) Royal Dublin Fusiliers (16022), 32.75 years, 5′ 7″, ruddy complexion, light brown hair, blue eyes, labourer, enlisted 31st October 1916 in Galashields, missing on 12th July 1917 at Naas. (Police Gazette, Aug 14th, 1917).

 

Maurice Boyle

Maurice Boyle was born in Loughanure was a son of Doney Boyle

 

Denis McCafferty

Denis McCafferty from Derrynamansher joined the Duke of Cornwall Light Infantry and was wounded twice in action.

Patrick Mulholland

Patrick Mulholland born in the Learden/Plumbridge area of Co. Tyrone. Upon his marriage to Brigid ‘Frank’ Boyle from Keadue, he moved to Donegal were they raised their family. Paddy and Brigid later moved to Scotland but was seasonally migrating from their new home in  Mullaghderg Mountain when he joined the 2nd Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) in Scotland  receiving the regimental number 11646. Paddy entered the theatre of war in France in Oct 1914.  In a letter to the Derry Journal in November 1915, Paddy was noted to have been injured a number of times ‘wounds in the knead foreheads bullet through his right hand, with the latest and saddest, a disabled back, due toeing thrown ten feet into the air by a shell, four of the six in the party were killed outright.’ He was reported missing in action in the Mid-Lothian Journal on 1st September 1916, possibly from one of the Battles of the Somme that had taken place the previous July and August. He deserted on the 18th July 1917. Paddy injuries caused him to be admitted to hospitals in Scotland and Donegal. Paddy died on July 20th 1930 aged 55 years.                                                                          

Patrick Boyle

Patrick Boyle son of John Boyle, Meendernasloe joined the Canadian Overseas Railway Construction Corps (No.62) at John, N.B, Canada on 15th March 1915 and served in England,France, Belgium and Canada from 25th August 1915 to 1919. He was demobilised in Vancouver in 1919. He was admitted to the Queen Alexandria Barracks Hospital on the 4th April 1916 suffering from bronchitis and was given a clean bill of health to return to the front on 19th January 1917. He died in 1952 at Ocean Falls, British Columbia.

 

Manus Ward

Manus Ward Keadue born 11/8/1887, discharged in Dublin on August 4th 1917 because of an old injury from working in Scotland, 4th Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, No. 21861, He had two daughters Mary born 11/11/1913 and Bridget born 15/3/1916.

Hugh Doogan

Hugh Doogan son of Daniel Doogan of, Crolly, a farm labourer,  joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (21466) in Hamilton on the 18th November 1914 aged 37 years.He transferred to the 7th Battalion on the 15th August 1915. He was serving in France with the British Expeditionary Force when he deserted on 16th February 1916. He was traced to Annagry Post Office to where he wired money home to his folks. A letter from the Annagry Police Station in January 1917, stated that his whereabouts were unknown.He may have been a son of Daniel and Bridget nee Cannon Doogan, Annagry.

Peter Gallagher

Peter Gallagher 19 years old son of John Gallagher, Roshine, Burtonport joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers in Edinburgh on 2nd August 1900. He was discharged after one year of service. I believe he rejoined during the war and served with the Kings Own Border Regiment. He had a  brother called James.

Patrick Gorry

Patrick Joseph Gorry from Co.Mayo served in the war. He later lived with his wife Mary and family in Meenbanad, dying there on the 22th November 1946 aged 66 years. He is buried in Cruit Island Cemetery.

Charles O’Donnell

Charles O’Donnell was born in Lackenagh, Burtonport

File relates to Patrick Gallagher’s receipt of a partial dependents’ gratuity of £25 (twenty five pounds sterling) under the Army Pensions Act, 1923 in respect of his son National Army Private 56568 James Gallagher. Private James Gallagher died on 10 October 1922 from a bullet wound received by him during an escape attempt by Republican prisoners in Mountjoy Prison during the Civil War. James Gallagher had served with the North Irish Horse and the Royal Cycle Corps (Army Cyclist Corps) in the British armed forces prior to joining the National Army. File includes: original telegraphs of 11 and 13 October 1922 from Captain Stafford, Portobello Barracks addressed to “Gallagher, Acres Burtonport” informing recipient of the death of James Gallagher and of the arrangements for the removal of his remains by train from Dublin to Burtonport; signed standard report of 5 February 1924 from the Defence Forces Office of the Adjutant General to the Secretary, Army Pensions Department regarding the date and circumstances of Private James Gallagher’s death; material relating to the Gárda Síochána investigation in the circumstances and means of the Gallagher family and the degree of dependency of Patrick Gallagher on his son James at the time of his death; and reference to James Gallagher’s surviving brothers and sisters.  

Anthony O’Donnell

Anthony O’Donnell Belcruit, claimed the pension for his son Anthony O’Donnell, Gunner, Royal Field Artillery (655/146) who died from Phitisis after discharge on 24th August 1920.

Others to die

Francis Rodgers

Francis Rodgers a son of Ellen Rodgers Meenacrieve Annagry and Glenties joined the 9th Batalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers (25544) sometime after 1915. He was killed in action on the 13th November 1916 aged 20 years.He is buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery in France.

Fergal McCahill

Fergal McCahill from Sheskinarone and Kincasslagh joined the 8th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Hamilton on the 20th December 1915 (No: 16968). He was killed in action on 29th April 1916 in Flanders. He is remembered on the Loos Memorial.

Others to die

James Bonner Upper Keadue

 

Arranmore

Andrew Earley

 Andrew Early from Poolawaddy

Dominick Gallagher

Dominick Gallagher son of Fanny Gallagher, Illion, Arranmore  and a private in the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (3/24226) when missing in action on 27th January 1917. His mother received a pension of 7s 6d per week from 27th August 1919.

John Joseph O’Donnell 

John Joseph O’Donnell from Arranmore

John O’Donnell

John O’Donnell (Jack) from Plochóg killed at Ieper 1917

John Barrett

John Barrett born in Arranmore 0n 29th April 1875 , where his father was a policeman. His parents were natives of the Ballina area of Co. Mayo. He had the rank of Able Seaman in the Royal Navy. He was drowned on 18th April 1918 while serving aboard HMS Motor Lighter “X.91” ,an Admiralty X type landing craft. He is buried in Tomnahurich Cemetery, Inverness, Scotland.

James Boyle

James Boyle from Arranmore

John Bonner

John Bonner (Brian) served in France

Patrick Bonner

Patrick Bonner from Leabgarrow

John Early

John Early from Aphort joined the army and served in France

Owen Gallagher

Owen Gallagher from Illion

Condy McCafferty

Condy McCafferty served in the Royal Navy 

Joe O’Donnell

Joe O’Donnell from Leabgarrow served in the Royal Navy. His ship was late for Jutland. He died in the mid 1980s.

Joseph Coll

Joseph Coll was drafted into the US Army at Shoshone, Idaho. He was born in Arranmore on 18th April 1890.

Patrick Gallagher

Patrick Gallagher, a 22 year old farm labourer with an address at Kinloss Farm, Dumbarton, joined the Royal Highlander-Black Watch(11536) in Perth on 13th September 1915. He was a son of Mary Gallagher, Leagarrow. He was discharged after eighty five days.

*Others involved- information from newspapers

Byrne, Harley’s, McCarron, O’Doherty, 5x Duffy’s, 3 x Rodgers’, one was a signaller in the Navy, 5 x Doogans, 6 x Sharkey (2 were badly wounded by Nov 1915 and one was missing in action since the ‘big advance’ of September 1915), Frank O’Donnell, Mullaghduff.

Upper Rosses

William Cannon

William Cannon son of Francis and Mary Cannon nee O’Donnell Derrynaspool and Stranabaggart enlisted in the Infantry Branch of Machine Gun Corps. He survived the war but died from the Spanish Flu on 8th March 1919 aged 41 years. He is buried in Denny and Dunipace Cemetery, Stirlingshire, Scotland in Grave 1425.

Isaac Logue

Isaac Logue son of Patrick and Bridget Logue, Doochary enlisted in the 6th Battalion, Royal Munster Fusiliers in Motherwell. He died on 7th August 1915 at Gallipoli aged 27 years. He had then the rank of Corporal. He is remembered on Panel 185-90 on Helles Memorial in Turkey.

Joseph McHugh

Joseph McHugh, son of Peter and Annie McHugh nee Sweeney was born in Derrylaconnell on 15th October 1888. He emigrated to the Unitied States and joined C 316 Company, Infantry Regiment, US Army. He died in France on the last day of the war.

James Boyle

James Boyle born in the Rosses joined the 253rd Tunnelling Coy, Royal Engineers. He was killed in action on 15th April 1917. His remains are buried in Sailly-Labourse Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

Morris Ward

Morris Ward son of Owen and Sheila Ward Chapel Road, Dungloe was born on 5th May 1893. He enlisted in the 12th Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers and received the regimental number 12252. He was killed in action on 25th September 1915 and is remembered on Panel 10-13 of Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

John O’Donnell

John O’Donnell was born in the parish of Templecrone. He enlisted in the 6th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry and died on 16th August 1915. He is remembered on Panel 173-77 on Helles Memorial, Turkey 

Anthony Gallagher

Anthony Gallagher son of John and Brigid Gallagher nee Boyle was in Drimlaghdrid on 4th March 1880. He enlisted in the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. He was killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1st July 1916. He is remembered at Thiepval Memorial in France.

Daniel Gallagher

 Daniel Gallagher son of Morgan and Mary Gallagher nee Boner of Cronamaddow, Dungloe enlisted in the 1st Battalion Irish Guards and received the regimental number 5591. He was killed in action in France on 9th August 1915 aged 39 years. He is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France in Grave IV.D.40

John Gallagher

John Gallagher son of John and Mary Gallagher born in Templecrone and resident in Dungloe joined the 1st Battalion Irish Guards. He was killed in action in France on 27th March 1918. He is remembered on Bay 1 of Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

John McCauley

John McCauley son of Edward and Peggy McCauley Cullion, Dungloe was born in Glasgow. He enlisted in  the A Company, 2nd Battalion, Royal Irish Fusiliers in Cork. He was killed in action at Ypres, Belgium on 23rd April 1915 aged 22 years. He is remembered on Panel 42of Menin Gate Memorial, Ieper, Belgium.

 P. J. Flaherty

P. J. Flaherty was a son of Constable John (RIC) and Grace Flaherty nee Cahill (Meenagowan) . After emigrating to Canada, he joined the 19th Battalion Canadian Infantry, Central Ontario Regiment. He received the regimental number 693308. He died in France on 4th March 1918 aged 27 years and is buried in Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery, British Extension- Pas de Calais, France in Grave V.R.6.

J. ‘Clyde’ Melly

J. Clyde Melly son of John and Madge Melly nee Byrne Farrigans. He was an Able Seaman in Drake Battalion of The Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. His regimental number was Z/3501. He was killed in action on 11th September 1915 and is buried in Lancashire Landing Cemetery in Turkey in Grave 89.

James Molloy

 James Molloy son of John and Cecelia Molloy nee Brennan was born in Meenacarn on 2th February 1891. He enlisted in Greenock into the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers receiving the regimental number 23444. He was killed on the first day of the battle of the Somme on 1st July 1916. He is remembered on Pier and Face 4D and 5B at Thiepval Memorial in France.

Tom Molloy

Tom Molloy, from Meenacarn possibly a  brother of James above. He had a brother called Thomas  born  on 14th May 1888.

Patrick O’Donnell

Patrick O’Donnell born in Madavagh, Lettermacaward enlisted in the 6th Battalion, Connaught Rangers and received the regimental number 6227. He died on 16th February 1917. He is buried  in Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium in Grave M.56.

Frank Boyle

Frank Boyle, Falmore joined the Scottish Rifles

Dan Gallagher

Dan Gallagher Tearmon joined the Irish Guards and was killed in France

John Gallagher

John Gallagher born in Templecrone was killed in action on 27th March 1918 in France. He was a Private in the 1st Battalion Irish Guards.

Daniel Gallagher

Daniel Gallagher from the Lower Rosses was killed in action in France on 27th January 1917. He was a Private in the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. 

John McCarron

John McCarron son of Charles and Sarah McCarron nee Campbell was born in Brockagh on 11th February 1876. He joined the 6th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. He was killed on the last days of the war. He is buried in Dourles Communal Cemetery Extension-Nord, France in Grave I.C.25. 

Frank Boyle

Frank Boyle son of Mary Boyle, Falmore, Dungloe was born in Pittsburgh, USA joined the 11th Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) No:12218 in Bathgate on the 11th May 1915 and died of wounds in Flanders on the 1st October of that year. He was originally buried in the German Military Cemetery in Bauvin and later re-interred in Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery which lies south of the town of Souchez in France. The cemetery contains more than 7,650 burials of servicemen of the British Empire in the First World War.

Image: Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Andrew McAleer

Andrew McAleer born in Omagh was a son of Edward McAleer, of Ballyhottie, Omagh, Co. Tyrone.  Annie nee Brennan of Arthur, Ontario, Canada and resided in Dungloe. He joined the 9th Battalion Princess Victoria’s Royal Irish Fusiliers (No: 42433) in Belfast. His medal roll records that he didn’t enlist until after 1915.  He was killed in action on 1st October 1918 in Flanders. He was formerly a private in the Royal Irish Rifles. He is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial in West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.  Andrew and Annie (daughter of James Brennan) married on April 22th 1917 in St Patrick’s Church, Eskra, Co. Tyrone when Annie was at service in Cormone, Eskra, Omagh. In the 1911 census an Annie Brennan (age 15 years) was recorded with her parents James and Nancy and siblings Jack, James and Peter in Meenacross, Dungloe.

Andrew McNulty

Andrew McNulty born in Ardveen June 8th 189, he was a son of Andrew and Nancy McNulty nee Walsh. He enlisted in Scotland in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in 1914 but later changed to the tunnelling corps of the Royal Engineers. He survived the war and married Sarah McBride from Magheralosk. They resided in Hamiliton.

Frank Boyle

Frank Boyle from Falmore joined the Rifles. Its believed he died in the war.

Dan Gallagher

Dan Gallagher from Tearmon. He joined the Irish Guards and was killed in France.

Others from the Upper Rosses

Patrick Bonner

Patrick Bonner from Derrylaconnell.

Patrick Bonner

Patrick Bonner who gave his address as Lettermacaward Parish, nearest town Doochary was a 27 years and 183 days old miner when he joined the 10th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry at Hamilton on 20th August 1914.

Thomas Molloy

Thomas Molloy from Doochary was a Chaplin at the front. He was later parish priest of the Dungloe parish.

Hugh Doherty

Hugh Doherty from Dungloe joined the Irish Guards and was wounded the war.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher from Meendrain joined the Irish Guards.

Thomas Duggan

Thomas Dugan[sic], a boiler maker, born in the parish of Dungloe in 1893, joined the 1st Depot Battalion, Canadian Overseas Regiment, C.E.F., in Toronto on 31st October 1917. He stated the his parent were deceased  and that his next of kin was his sister Mary who he lived with, at 22 W, 18th St, Bayonne, New Jersey, USA. He landed in France on 26th February 1918, but only there least that two months when he was declared as a deserter by a Court of Inquiry on 19th April 1918. No further information.

Daniel Boyle

Daniel Boyle born in Dungloe on 20th May 1875, but with an address at 408 W, 33rd St, New York City enrolled in the US Navy as a Machinist. He crossed the Atlantic twice between June and September 1918.

Pat O’Donnell

Pat O’Donnell from Loch Salt joined the Scottish Rifles.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher joined the Highland Light Infantry.

George Kerr 

George Kerr from Falcorrib joined the Royal Garrison Artillery.

Frank McLaughlin

Frank McLaughlin from Dungloe joined the Connaught Rangers. 

Willie Browne

 Willie Browne from Lettermacaward joined the Inniskilling Fusiliers.

Phil Boyle

Phil Boyle from Falmore joined the Scottish Rifles.

Jim McCarron

 Jim McCarron from Meenleckalore joined the Inniskilling Fusiliers.

James McCarron

James McCarron joined the 6th Connaught Rangers, no.4789 or no.48493 on back of medal.

John Boyle

John Boyle from Roshine, he wrote letter to bishop from Nigg Camp, could be from Ardara.

Jim Boyle

Jim Boyle from Marameelan.

Neil Boyle

Neil Boyle from Marameelan joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and was wounded in action. his brother John was also in the army, and lived in Scotland

John Boyle

John Boyle from  Marameelan joined the Irish Guards.

Jim McShea

Jim McShea from Marameelan joined the Irish Fusiliers.

Con Brennan

Con Brennan from Meenacross joined the Irish Guards.

Con Brennan

Con Brennan son of Jack and Annie (nee Ferry) Brennan, Meendrain joined the 8th Battalion was born on 13th April 1877. He joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (service number 26520). He was was fighting with the 36th Ulster Division when he was killed in action at Ginchy, Somme on 9th September 1916. He is remembered on Thiepval Memorial (Pier and Face 4D and 5B), Somme, France.

Pat Gallagher

Pat Gallagher from Tearmon.

Jack McCarron

Jack McCarron from Brockagh.

John McCann

John McCann son of Charles and Sarah McCann, Brockagh joined the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. He died on 8th November 1918 aged 44 years. He took part in the last battle of the war, just four days before armistice. He is buried in Dourles Communal Cemetery Extension, France. His comrade P McFadden from Newtonstewart, Co. Tyrone was laid to rest beside him. (Should his surname be McCarron?).

John Boyle

John Boyle from Brockagh.

Con O’Donnell

Con O’Donnell from the Diamond, Dungloe.

William Boyle

William Boyle from Dungloe joined the Royal Army Ordnance Corps (10045). He was born around spring 1870. He stated that his next of kin was his sister Catherine who resided at 5th Avenue, Petterburg, USA. No further information.

Frank McLaughlin

Frank McLaughlin a 34 year old coal miner joined Machine Gun Corps in Glasgow on 12th Sept 1914 where he was tranferred joined 5th Battalion Connaught Rangers at Galway a few days later. He stated that his next of kin was his mother Mrs Casson[sic] McLaughlin who resided in Dungloe. He served in Malta in 1915 and was transferred the Machine Gun Corps on 10th May 1916. Shortly after his health broke down and was admitted to a field hospital on 1st July 1916 with Pyrexia, and transferred to hospital in Salonica with P.U.O., the same day. After treatment his condition improved but this was short lived; he was admitted to hospital in Malta with Malaria 21st July 1916. He rejoined the field on 9th October 1916 but was again admitted the same day, this time in Salonika where he spent the winter; finally getting a clean bill of heath on 16th March 1917. He was transferred to the 6th Labour Corps (489366) on 27th April 1917 and served there until he was discharged on 9th March 1919. He received a pension of 5s 6d per week.He was living at 74 Davingaler Row, Dilarter, Hamilton in 1920.

Willie Hanlon

Willie Hanlon from Tuberkeen joined the Irish Guards.

Edward Hanlon

Edward Hanlon son of Natheniel and Jane Hanlon nee Hamilton of Tuberkeen joined 3rd Rifles, 34th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force on the 24th March 1916. Born in 1880, he worked in Glacken’s Dungloe for four and a half years before emigrating to Australia. 

Patrick Kennedy

Patrick Kennedy, a Lance Corporal with the Irish Guards (5349) was killed in action on 18th May 1915. His father John Kennedy, RIC Barrack, Dungloe claimed his gratuity money on 18th August 1916.

John Boyle

John Boyle born in Dungloe aged 42 years and 6 months, joined the Royal Scots (1338) at Hamilton on 10th October 1914. He and his wife Mary nee Duthie who he married on 1st May 1905, and their 9 year old daughter Rose resided at 5H Bothwell Park Rows, Bellshill. He served in Scotland until he was discharged on 29th January 1915.

Joseph Bonner

Joseph Bonner, a 27 year old miner, with an address at YMCA, Chicago, joined the Canadian Engineers, C.E.F. (2007278) in Toronto on 29th January 1918. His records show that after he arrived in England in July 1918, en route to the front, he when AWOL and was declared a deserter on 9/9/1918. He was a son of  Mrs Aba Bonner, Dungloe and was born on Christmas Day 1891.

Owen Devenney

Owen Devenney, son of Francis and Barbara Devenney, Maghery, a farmer, with an address at Imra, Alberta, Canada joined the 151st Overseas Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force (624912) at Wainwright, Alberta on 22th February 1916. Owen who was born in Maghery in 1875, had fought in the Spanish American War with the 6th Calvary, US Army. He stated that his sister Miss Mary Devenney, 1907 Rittenhouse St, Philadelphia, USA was his next of kin. 

On dis-embarking the ‘Llandovery Castle” in France on 30th October 1916, he was transferred to the 1st Tunnelling Company, Canadian Engineers. He was hit by shrapnel in the right side on 29th July 1917 and was discharged from further service on 22nd February 1918.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher, a private in Irish Guards (2769) was killed in action on 27th Mar 1918. This sister Miss Annie Gallagher, Meendrain claimed his pension.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher, brother of James Gallagher, Meendrain,  served in the “A” Battery, 59th Artillery (C.A.C.) in France. He set sail for Europe aboard the “Olympic” from New York on 28th March 1918.

Cornelius Brennan

Cornelius Brennan, 20 years old son of James Brennan, Meenacross, with an address in West-Calder joined the Irish Guards(7756) on 20th April 1915. No more information.

Edward O’Donnell 

Edward O’Donnell, son of Cecilia O’Donnell, Cleendra, a private in Supply Company, 328th Infantry, US Army, sailed from Bordeaux aboard “Ohioan” in route to Hoboken, New Jersey on 22th May 1919, after completed his tour of duty.

John Boyle

John Boyle from Dungloe.

Patrick Boyle

Patrick Boyle, born in Dungloe (Parish), Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, 28 years, 5′ 6”, labourer, joined Glencorse, 15 August 1916, deserted on 16th August 1916 en route to Omagh. (From the Police Gazette 5th September 1916)

Manus Boyle

Manus Boyle, born in Dungloe (Parish), Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, 19.75 years, 5′ 7”, pit labourer, joined Glencorse, 15 August 1916, deserted on 16th August 1916 en route to Omagh. (From the Police Gazette 5th September 1916)

Charles Gallagher

Charles Gallagher, born in Dungloe (Parish), 3rd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, 21.25 years, 5′ 2”, Black hair, Grey eyes, labourer, joined Greenock, 14th February 1916, deserted on 11th July 1916 in Derry. (From the Police Gazette 14th August 1917)

Patrick Boyle

Patrick Boyle from somewhere in the Rosses.

Hugh Ward

Hugh Ward from somewhere in the Rosses, a  general labourer, joined the Army Veterinary Corps-Special Reserves-Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers at Edinburgh on 28th September 1914.He went to war with the Ex Force on 17th December 1914, where he spent a year, returning on  29th December 1915. He served at home until 2nd May 1918. He stated that his next of kin was his brother Edward but didn’t know Edward’s address

Thomas Sullivan

Thomas Sullivan from Dungloe joined the forces but didn’t served in the war.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher, aged 31 years, from Dooey, Lettermacaward enrolled in the US Navy on 19th March 1918. He completed 74 days training at Pelham Bay Park Training Camp where he passed out as a 2nd Class Seaman. He served on a water tender in New York from the 24th October 1918 until the end of the war.

C. Farry

C. Farry, a brother of Mrs M. Reid, Ranny, Lettermacaward was killed in action on 1st May 1917. He was a private in the Royal Iniskilling Fusiliers (26520). His sister received a pension on 13th September 1919.

John Melly

John Mealey[sic], son of John Melly, Farigans, Lettermacaward, aged 21 years and 10 months old, joined the 2nd Reserve Battalion, Royal Garrison Artillery (17655) in Greenock in 1907. When war was declared, he was re-mobilised at Gosport on 5th August 1914. John Melly married Mary Falconer, Storaways, Greenock on 25th November 1912. They had one daughter called Bridget who was born in Greenock on 13th April 1914, but little Bridget died from Measles and Laryngitis on 3rd November 1915. While fighting with the 35th Heavy Battery in France, John received a gun-shot wound in the abdomen and was admitted to the General Hospital in Rouen on 15th October 1916, he was later transferred to the Londonderry War Hospital and later to hospital in Warrington a week later. 

Frank Melly

Frank Mealey[sic], son of John Kelly, Farigans, Lettermacaward, a private in “H” Company, 52nd Pioneers, Infantry Regiment, US Army left Brest, France aboard USS K. I. Luckenbach in route to America on 31st Mar 1919, after completed his tour of duty

Patrick O’Donnell

Patrick O’Donnell, son of Sarah O’Donnell, Madavagh, Doochary joined the Connaught Rangers (4/6277). He survived the war and received a pension on 15th March 1923.

Melly

The Melly brothers from Lettermacaward, 4 in British Army from Greenock, 3 in US Army, sons of Johnny Joe and Bridget Melly nee Byrne.Johnny, Neily, Joe were in the British Army.

John Gallagher

John Gallagher no.23237, aged 27yrs and 9 months, enlisted in KOSB on 22/6/1916, was discharged on 20/7/1916. He was a son of Mary Gallagher, Cranamadua.

Neil O’Donnell

Neil “Biddy”O’Donnell from Innisfree emigrated to America and went to war with the US Army. When he returned from America, he and his wife Jeanie lived in Tuberkeen.

Cormick Cannon

Cormick Connon[sic] son of John Cannon of Meenacarn, Lettermacaward joined the Merchant Marine Reserve. He was appointed as a 4th Class Greaser and served aboard M.S. Marchioness of Breadalbane. He died from Pulmonary Tuberculosis on 17th October 1921. His father John born in 1851 claimed his war pension.

Francis Jennings Molloy, Doochary-RAF

Andrew O’Donnell

Andrew O’Donnell son of Hugh and Ellen O’Donnell Roshine, Dungloe was born on 16 January 1893. He emigrated to America on 8th June 1913 where he was drafted. He fought with the US Army in Europe. He survived the war but died in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvannia in 1936 aged 45 years. He is pictured below with his sister Kate Lynch.

Image: Kathleen Lynch Collection

 

Denis Cannon

Denis son of John and Cecily Cannon (nee McHugh), Lettermacaward served in the Merchant Navy aboard H.M. Tug “Flying Buzzard” on the Clyde in WW1. He drowned on 21st January 1915 aged 35 years and was laid to rest in Lettermacaward Graveyard

 

https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/662679/cannon,-dennis/
Image: http://www.irishgraveyards.ie

Gweedore

Daniel Boyle

Trimmer Daniel Boyle a native of Middle Dore was a son of John and Madge Boyle nee O’Donnell. He was lost at sea when the converted liner S.S.Tuncania was sunk off the north Irish coast on February 4th 1918. He was only 20 years of age. He is remembered at the Tower Hill Memorial in London. He was a nephew of Michael O’Donnell from Mullaghduff who was killed in action on September 17th 1916.

Denis Boyle

Trimmer Denis Boyle a native of Upper Dore was a son of Ned and Rose Boyle nee Sweeney. He was lost at sea when the troopship S.S. Tuncania was sunk off the north Irish coast on February 4th 1918. He was only 19 years old. He is remembered at the Tower Hill Memorial in London.

James O’Donnell

James O’Donnell son of James and Mary O’Donnell Ballindrait was lost at sea when the troopship S.S. California was sunk in the North Channel near the Scottish coast on February aQ7th 1917. In the summer of 1914 the S.S. California then a liner with the Anchor Line ran aground on Tory Island. James was aged 22 years and is remembered at the Tower Hill Memorial in London.

Owen Harkin

A native of Carrickastakin, Owen was a son of John and Rose Harkin nee Boyle. He enlisted in the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Hamilton and received the regiment number 18109. He was killed in action in Gallipoli on Tuesday June 8th 1915 aged 27 years. He left behind a widow Annie nee Gallagher and his son Owenie in Sleeghan, who never meet his father. He is remembered on Panel 190 to 196 at the Helles Memorial in Turkey.

Prionsias Gallagher

 A native of Carrick, Prionsias a son of Francis and Máire Gallagher nee Sweeney enlisted in the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers and received the regiment number 18108. He was killed in action on June 14th 1915, just 6 days after his friend Owen Harkin from Carrickastaskin with whom he enlisted with in Hamilton. He is buried in Twelve Trees Cemetery in Helles, Turkey. 

Charles Conaghan

Charles Conaghan was born in Stranacorckra in 1880 to Hugh and Grace Conaghan nee McClafferty. Shortly after his parents emigrated to Australia leaving Charles behind at relations.  When Charles was in his teens he emigrated to his parents in Rockhampton, Queensland. On January 30th 1915, Charles enlisted at Winton, Queensland and joined the 7th Rifles, 5th Light Horse Regiment.  He disembarked Brisbane on August 20th 1915 on HMAT Shorpshire to the theatre of war. Charles survived the war and was serving with the Australian Imperial Canteen Force in Egypt when he suddenly took ill on January 3rd 1919. He succumbed the next day from the Spanish Flu. He is buried in Kantara Military Cemetery Egypt.

Michael Coll

Michael Coll born on October 13th 1884, a son of Thomas and Madge Coll nee Boyle Derrybeg was believed to have died as a result of war at the Dardanelles. He was a brother of Thomas, Charles, John, Fergal, Dermot, Anna, Kate and Mary.

Teague Coyle

Teague Coyle son of Thomas and Máire Coyle nee McFadden Bloodyforeland. He was killed in action at the Somme on August 25th 1918 while serving with the 9th Battalion Royal Fusiliers. He is buried in Fricourt British Cemetery in northern France.

Credit: https://www.cwgc.org/image-credits

Teague Coyle

Teague Coyle son of Mrs Grace Coyle Bloodyforeland enlisted in the 1st Battalion Highland Light Infantry in Berwick on Tweed. He received the regimental number 28715. Teague was killed in action in Mesopotamia on January 11th 1917. He is buried in the Amara War Cemetery in present day Iraq. 

James Doohan

James Doohan son of James and Grace Doohan Meenaclady enlisted in Edinburgh in the 5th Battalion Connaught Rangers. He died of wounds aged 40 years, in the 32th Field Ambulance in Salonika on September 30th 1916, the same day as Corporal Hugh Ferry from Sheskinbeg. He is buried in Struma Military Cemetery, Greece. James’ brother Manus was killed in Belgium just 6 weeks earlier.

Manus Doohan

Manus Doohan son of James and Grace Doohan Meenaclady joined the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in Clydebank and received the regimental number 23328. He died of wounds received on Flanders Fields on August 9th 1916 aged 45 years. He is buried in Poperinge New Military Cemetery Belgium.

William Duffy

William Duffy a native of Moville joined the 8th Mountain Brigade, Royal Garrison Artillery and saw action in the Middle Eastern theatre of war in Palestine. He died of wounds on May 16th 1918 aged 33 years. William was survived by his wife Brigid nee Coll of Gola Island. He is buried in Ramleh War Cemetery in present day Israel. 

Charles Ferry

Charles Ferry son of Manus and Sarah Ferry nee McFadden was born in Bunbeg, but resided in Bellshill, Lanarkshire. He enlisted in the 9th Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) at Hamilton. He was presumed to have been killed in action on May 1st 1917 while serving with the British Expeditionary Force in France. He was later declared dead and his father Manus received gratuity for his services in 1919.

Charles Ferry

Charles Ferry son of Manus Ferry, Knockfola, a private in the 9th Battalion, Royal Scots Rifles went missing in action on 1st June 1917. His father received pension of 6s per week on 1st April 1919.

Hugh Ferry

Hugh Ferry (29637) from Derrybeg

Hugh Ferry

Corporal Hugh Ferry son of Tarlach and Máire Ferry nee Roarty enlisted in the 20th Heavy Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery in Edinburgh. He was killed in action in Salonika on September 28th 1916 aged 47 years. He is buried in Lembet Road Millitary Cemetery Greece

James Ferry

James Ferry son of Micheál and Julia Ferry was born in Gweedore, but had an address in St Johnston, Co. Donegal when he joined the Royal Engineers at Glencorse Barracks Penicuik Mid Lothian and was later transferred to the 12th Battalion Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment). He was promoted to the non commissioned rank of Lance Corporal during his time at the Western Front. He died of wounds on October 14th 1917 at Ypres aged 38 years. He is buried in Mendingham Millitary Cemetery, Zillebeke, Belgium. He was survived by his sister Mrs Maggie Sweeney.

Dominic Gallagher

Dominic Ruadh Gallagher from Glassagh enlisted in Dalkeith in the 2nd Battalion Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment and received the regimental number 16751. He was killed in action near Ypres, Belguim on July 20th 1915 aged 32 years. He was survived by his wife Mary. He was laid to rest in the “ an unknown soldiers” section of Poelcapelle British Cemetery Belgium but his grave was later identified and a white headstone bearing his name and regiment details was placed over him.

Hugh J Gallagher

 Hugh J Gallagher son of Seamus and Kate Gallagher Lower Knockastoller joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Glasgow and received the regimental number 27345. He died of wounds in No.8 Station Hospital north of Boulogne on August 5th 1917 aged 23 years. He is buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery France.

James Gallagher

James Gallagher son of Oliver and Kate Gallagher nee Gallagher Magheragallon enlisted in the 1st Battalion Royal Scots Guards in Edinburgh. He was killed in action just several months into the war on November 11th 1914 aged 35 years. The war was to last some four years to the day. He is remembered on Panel II Menin Gate in Ieper Belgium. He has been incorrectly recorded as a member of the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers in some publications.

James Gallagher

Gunner James Gallagher son of Michael and Bríd Gallagher nee Gallagher Strakeenagh was locally known as Jimmy Mhicí Chonchubhar. He joined the “A” Battery, 38th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery(217952). He accidentally drowned on May 22nd 1918 and is remembered on Panel I Ploegsteert Memorial Hainaut Belgium.

Teague Gallagher

Lance Corporal Teague Gallagher son of Patrick and Sophia Gallagher nee McBride enlisted in the 1st Battalion Irish Guards in Edinburgh on August 17th 1915. He received the regimental number 6504. He died on October 9th 1917 aged 24 years and is remembered on Panel III.A.19 Ploegsteert Memorial Hainaut Belgium. He was survived by his mother Sophia, brothers Michael, Hugh, Patrick and Peter (Boston) and sisters Sarah and Fanny.

Edward McFadden  

Edward McFadden son of Éamonn and Kate McFadden nee O’Donnell Carrickmagarvey joined the 8th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and received the regimental number 25206. He was killed in action in France on September 9th 1916 aged 32 years. He is remembered on Pier and Face 4D and 5B at Thiepval Memorial Somme France

Connell McGarvey

Connell McGarvey son of Philip and Brigid McGarvey nee Friel Innisherrer Island. He joined the Royal Navy Reserve and became a deckhand on a requisitioned Steam Drifter renamed HM Bluebell used for minesweeping duties. He died on April 1st 1918, just 3 days before his 19th birthday and is buried in Wallasey Cemetery, Rake Lane, Liscard, Wallasey, Cheshire.

James Murray

James Murray was born in Dunlewey Far to John and Kate Murray nee McKendry, where his father was employed as a coachman. James joined the 9th battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers in Belfast and was killed on the first day of the battle of the on July 1st 1916 aged 22 years. He is remembered on Pier and Face 16C Thiepval Memorial Somme France and inside Dunlewey Chapel.

Hugh O’Brien

Hugh O’Brien son of Patrick and Ellen O’Brien Glassaghcoo enlisted in the Royal Irish Fusiliers (12148)in Inverkeithing and later was assigned to 10th Divisional  Company, Army Cyclist Corps (1555). He died in the Prince of Wales Hospital Tottenham, London on June 12th 1915 aged 18 years following an accident.  He is buried in Tottenham and Wood Green Cemetery on Saturday 19th June 1915. * according to his service record he was aged 20 years and 5 months when he joined in Stirling on 2nd September 1914. 

Charlie McGee

Charlie Mór McGee from Dole served in the Irish Guards. After the war he was Captain of Gweedore (South) Company of the Irish Volunteers.

Frank Roarty

Frank Roarty, Magheraclogher, son of James Roarty, a 24 year old policeman with an address at 101 Dumbarton Road, Bridgeton, Glasgow joined the Irish Guards (5037) in Glasgow in 31st August 1914, joined at Caterham on 2nd September 1914, appointed Lance Corporal on 20th September 1916, proved to Corporal and Lieut Sergeant on 10th October 1917. Service: Home 31st August 1914-31st May 1915  British Ex Force: Embarked from Southampton1st June 1915; wounded in action at Bethune on 22nd October 1915, he wasn’t admitted to hospital on this occasion or on a subsequent time, but when he was wounded for a third time; in the right thigh on 2nd June 1916, he was hospitalised until the 9th June 1916. British Ex Force returned to England on 19th June 1918 and was demobilised in London (Class Z Ares) on 25th April 1919.The following year he was admitted to the Military Hospital, Rochester Row, S. W, London from 29th December 1919 until 4th January 1919 suffering from ‘G’. He was admitted again, to Hemel Hempstead Military Hospital from 4th November 1919 but was finally cured of this condition on 23rd March 1920. Frank Roarty was finally discharged on 31st March 1920.

Charles Coppins

Charles Coppins son of Michael and Susan Coppins was born in Gweedore on December 18th 1883 where his father was a school teacher. Charles emigrated to Canada where he worked as a clerk. He enlisted in Montreal in the 4th MD, 1st  Depot Battalion, 1st Quebec Regiment.  

James Boyle

James Boyle son of Barney Boyle Upper Dore joined the 1st Battalion Dublin Fusiliers (17897) in Galashields on 26th December 1914. He was then aged 28 years and 9 months labourer and single. He was later transferred to the 3rd Battalion. James was discharged 5th July 1917 on health grounds.

James Boyle

James Boyle from Dunlewey, then aged 23 years and 90 days joined Royal Irish Fusiliers in Glasgow on 18th August 1914. He was posted to Dublin but was discharged, medically unfit on 10th Oct 1914 because of Chronic Bronchitis. He gave his father James Boyle’s name as next of kin with an address ℅ John Boyle,℅ Mr Barr, Bugtown Farm, Busby, Renfewshire. 

Owen McCole

Owen McCole son of Patrick and Margaret McCole, Meenacuing, then a 29 year old coal miner, joined the Irish Fusiliers in Hamilton on 26th Oct 1914, but was discharged after 4 days. He gave the following information about his siblings; brothers: John, Hugh, Bernard and Patrick; sisters: Sarah Gallard?, Sheila and Maggie.

John Ferry

John Ferry son of John Ferry, Meenaciung then a 19 year old seaman joined the Royal Irish Rifles (3/9339) on 1st July 1916 at Belfast. He was discharged in Dublin on 28th June 1916, as medically unfit

Edward Boyle

Edward Boyle son of Hugh Boyle, Ballidrait oined Royal Army Service Corps (DM 2/189831 as a lorry driver in Glasgow on 27th September 1915. He was then a 34 years and 10 months old (born 12/11/1879) tramway labourer, married, and was living at 126 Thistle St, S. S., Glasgow. He married Mary daughter of John McGee, Dore in St Mary’s Derrybeg on 30th January 1907. 

His children were as follows; Bridget born in Donegal on 16/4/1909, Edward born in Glasgow on 6/8/1911, Ned born in Glasgow on 26/11/1912 and Catherine born in Glasgow on 4/8/1915. He fought with the Expeditionary Force in France where he won the 1914/15 Star Medal. He was demobilised on the 19th February 1919. His then address was 12 Paterson St.

James Doherty

James Doherty (looks like Meenanillar) son of Celia, a labourer aged 25 years and 5 months joined at Inverkeithing on 2th September 1914. No further information.

John Boyle

John Boyle, a 23 year old farm labourer from Crolly joined the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (12933) in Edinburgh on 3rd September 1914. He was discharged as medically unfit on 16th December 1914.

Fred Gallagher

When Fred Gallagher son of John and Maggie Gallagher Lower Dore enlisted in 2nd Unit 49th Battalion Australian Imperial Force on October 26th 1915 he was 31 years and 11 months, 5’7”, 146lbs, of fair complexion with dark brown hair and blue eyes. After training in the art of war, Fred disembarked from Sydney aboard S.S. Hawkes Bay in April 1916 bound for Europe. He was promoted to the non commissioned rank of Lance Corporal on January 29th 1917 and was deployed in the village of Noreuil in northern France. In early 1917, General John Gellibrand, acting commander of the 2nd Division, advanced as he suspected that the Germans were withdrawing. Gellibrand’s advance began well but ended with a disastrous, ill planned and ill executed “unauthorised” attack on Noreuil. On the morning of April 2nd  1917, the village was attacked by the 50th  and 51st Battalions, with the 49th and 52nd in support. Danish-born Australian Private Jensenof the 50th Battalion was awarded the Victoria Cross for the part he played. Dore native Lance Corporal Fred Gallagher directed the 49th and supervised consolidation work. Although wounded and suffering intense pain, he continued his work under heavy fire until he was again more seriously wounded. His injuries were treated at a field hospital and when he improved he was taken to hospital in England aboard HMS Londonderry some three weeks later. This feat of gallantry awarded him the Military Medal. He was to stay in England for the remainder of the war. He married Madge Sweeney a daughter Fred Sweeney with an address at 13 Rutherglen Road Glasgow in St John Church Glasgow on January 6th 1918. Fred returned to Australia with his new bride Madge, who had been previously employed as a munitions worker in Glasgow. He was discharged from the military in 1919. 

John Gallagher

John Gallagher son of John and Maggie Gallagher Lower Dore was a 30 year coal lumper when he joined the 35th Battalion Australian Imperial Force in Brisbane on October 26th 1915. When John saw his inevitable posting to the theatre of war, he deserted that same day and was still on the run when he was court marshalled in his absence on December 6th 1915. John was described as being 5’ 5” in height with dark brown hair and blue eyes. He had previously served 20 months in the Royal Field Artillery in England.

Patrick Gallagher

Patrick Gallagher, a 34 year old labourer  and a son of Anthony and Nora Gallagher from Middle Dore joined the Royal Field Artillery (935997) in Kilmarnock. Patrick married Grace Mulligan daughter of Bryan in Brooklyn, New York on 2nd September 1902. They had five children when Patrick enlisted on 8th May 1915; Anthony born 13/2/1902, Sheila born 26/5/1904, John born 3/5/1907, Mary born 10/6/1908 and Margaret born 5/8/1911. He stated that all his children were born in Glasgow, where he and wife Grace resided. After. completing training and service at home, during which he spend he was admitted to hospital in Falkirk with pneumonia  he was sent to Salonika on 5th March 1917. No further information is to hand regarding his time in the Mediterranean. He returned home and on 15th June 1918 he was released as a shipyard labourer. 

 

Patrick Joseph Gallagher

Patrick Joseph Gallagher son of John and Maggie Gallagher Lower Dore was a 32 year old miner when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force on March 22nd 1916. He didn’t leave Australia. 

Edward McFadden

Edward McFadden son of Mrs H. McFadden Curransport was a 33 year old miner he joined the 17th Battalion Australian Imperial Force on April 4th 1915. He disembarked Sydney aboard HMAT Themistocles A32 on May 12th 1915 for war.

Patrick O’Donnell

Patrick O’Donnell son of Kate O’Donnell Gweedore was a 32 year old labourer when he enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in Kempsey New South Wales on December 14th 1916. He had previously served in the Royal field Artillery in England for 2 years. He was described as 5’6” tall, of reddish complexion with brown hair and grey eyes. 

Patrick Gallagher

Patrick Gallagher from Middle Dore enlisted in Unit 79, Royal Field Artillery in Kilmarnock on May 8th 1915 and received the regimental number 035997 and the rank oGunner. A son of Anthony and Nora O’Donnell, 34 year old Patrick was married to Grace nee Mulligan. Their marriage took place in Brooklyn New York. He saw service in Salonika and was injuried in the field in 1917. After the war he was discharged to his home at 30 William St Anderon Glasgow.

John McGeady

When farm labourer John McGeady enlisted in the Irish Guards in Edinburgh on January 27th 1914, he stated that he was born in Middletown 20 years and 316 days previously. He gave his also gave information about his immediate family. He recorded that his father’s name was Neil from Bloody Foreland and his mother’s name was Catherine. His brother Patrick and sisters Catherine, Mary, Annie and Biddy’s name were entered in the attestation document too. It is not known if John saw action in the war.

John McGeady

John McGeady, a 23 year old farm labourer from Bloody Foreland son of Neil McGeady enlisted in the Royal Irish Fusiliers (16176) in Edinburgh on October 31st 1914. He was already in the Irish Guards before the war but bought himself out for £10. He was invalided in Malta on 6th November 1915 and left for onbroard H.S “Re d’Italia” He deserted on 6th February 1916. He was court-marshalled at Luddan Camp, Buncrana on 28th February 1916 in his absence. Captain H.W.M. Yates, 2nd Lieut. E.K. Walkington and 2nd Lieut. H. Deaming together with Commanding Officer Lieut-Col. R.A. Lidwill declared that No. 16176 Private G McGady “D” Company, 3rd Royal Irish Fusiliers, illegally absented himself without leave at Luddan Camp, Buncrana, on the 6th February 1916; that he is still so absent and that on the 8th February 1916 he was deficient and that he is still deficient of the following articles:- 1 S.D. cap, I kit bag, 1 pair braces, 1 button brass, 1 polishing Brush, 1 cloth brush, 1 hair brush, 1 shaving brush, 1 tooth brush, 1 cap comforter, 1 comb, 1 holdall, 1 fork, 1 house-wife, 1 table knife, 1 razor, 3 shirts, 3 pairs socks, 1 spoon, 1 towel, 2 pairs boots, 2 S.D. jackets, 1 jersey, 2 S.D. trousers, 1 greatcoat.

John Doogan

John Doogan son of Charles and Rose Doogan Bunawack was aged 19 years and 30 days when he enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery in Glasgow on January 12th 1914. He was then a farm labourer living with his father at Semple Rose Bank Farm in Mid Calder. On his attestation document he was described as been 5’8” in height, of sallow complexion with brown hair and blue eyes.  He was discharged on April 9th 1914. It was common for young men to join local regiments in order to survive the winter when work was scarce on Scottish farms. It is not known if he was called up again for service later that year.

Joseph Doherty

Joseph Doherty from Gweedore survived his term on the battlefields of WW1 only to be fatally injured along with a fellow Gweedore man John Gallagher when both were struck by a ballast train near Dunbarton during WW2. He was survived by his wife and family.

Private Doogan

Private Doogan from Crolly served in 7th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers. When he deserted during the war, the War Office sent a letter to Annagry RIC Barracks inquiring of his whereabouts. The Annagry police replied stating that they search for Private Doogan but his whereabouts remained unknown.

J Duggan

Charles Duggan born in Gweedore (Parish) 3rd Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (31223), 18.5 years, 5′ 2″, labourer, enlisted 30th January 1917 in Dumbarton, went missing on 1st July 1917 in Derry.

Hugh O’Hanlon

Hugh O’Hanlon was born near Letterkenny in 1894. When he enlisted in the Royal Irish Regiment in Fermoy on February 2nd 1915, he gave an address in Dunlewey.

James Gallagher

James Gallagher, son of Charles Gallagher, Meenlaragh joined the 45th Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Forces (7742) in Sydney on 24th September 1917. He landed in Folkestone on 22nd July 1918 in route to France where he disembarked two days later. He was wounded in action in France on 17th August 1918 and invalided to Britain on the following week. James departed England for Australian 22th February 1919 aboard “City of Exeter”, a route that took them via Colombo.  James stated that he was born in Gweedore on 2nd April 1899 and served with the Connaught Rangers before the war, but paid for his release from the Crown forces.

Neil Duggan

Neil Duggan, a 34 year old labourer from Meenaclady joined the 17th Service Battalion, Welsh Regiment(25962) in Swansea on 7th January 1915. He was discharged on 26th March 1915. His sister Mary was his next of kin. 

Peter Doherty

Peter Doherty died from Tuberculosis after his discharge from the Royal Artillery S.E/C (M/319/632). His mother Bridget Doherty, Arduns received a pension in 1917.

John Devlin

John Devlin, 12 Railway Cottage, Gweedore, a 38 year plater joined the  Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (19661) in Derry on 8th February 1915. John who had previously served with the Inniskillings, was posted to France in April of that year, and was on the 30th August 1916, posted to the Mediterranean. On his record he stated that his wife Bridget nee McDaid formerly of Termon who he married on 30th April 1905 was residing in Dore with children James (stepson) born in Derry in 1904 and four others, including the youngest, 2 year old Agnes.

DSCF1141
A memorial in Kincasslagh Graveyard dedicated to Lower Rosses people who died as a result of war.